Tim Parsons, tparsons@tahoedailytribune.com

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August 2, 2012
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The Congress is in session for three Lake Tahoe shows

LAKE TAHOE — Members of the Congress are ideologues.

Its partisan agenda supports rock 'n' roll's traditional values and seeks would-be concert goers to elect to attend its shows. But its rival, electronica, has a populist following.

“There is a wave of music that's being recorded that's in the vein of the '70s,” Congress bassist Jonathan Meadows said. “Good rock and roll — the Black Keys and bunch of bands like that who are taking that approach to music.

“We think the best music was made during that period. We strive to play our instruments in the studio together using good microphones to record ourselves. That's really all you need for a good recording.”

The opposing party employs alien substances and ignores organics. Meadows can't stomach such a platform. He compares much of today's popular music to the 1980s-era disco that usurped the '70s rock from radio.

“History repeats itself but I think it's a phase,” Meadows said. “We're seeing it now with the giant electronica craze where kids are paying $20 just to see a person who's not playing an instrument on stage. We're kind of fighting against that grain. We like to say that we're a dying breed. There's not too many people that are writing songs and playing music.

“There are so many DJs out there who are making a living pushing a button on a damn computer. Everything has its place in this world and in the musical spectrum, but, man, I just get bummed out about that (stuff).”

Formed in 2009, the Denver-based Congress on May 4 released “Whatever You Want,” its debut record. (We, too, still call them records, brothers.)

The band has played the High Sierra festival and the Crystal Bay Casino several times. Meadows and co-founder and guitarist Scott Lane are natives of Virginia, and they have large following of former Southerners who now live in the Lake Tahoe Basin.

The Congress plays Thursday, Aug. 2 at Live at Lakeview's outdoor concert series at Lakeview Commons and later that same night at Brothers Place on Emerald Bay Drive in South Lake Tahoe. (Newly named Lakeview Commons is at South Shore and is not be confused with Commons Beach at North Shore, politicos pontificate.)

The Congress plays the Red Room after-party for Los Lonely Boys.

“I definitely appreciate what Los Lonely Boys do and I know that all three of them can sing their asses off and I look forward to seeing that,” Meadows said, sounding almost like a politician.


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Tahoe Daily Tribune Updated Aug 2, 2012 04:33PM Published Aug 2, 2012 04:30PM Copyright 2012 Tahoe Daily Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.