Niki Congero: Protect your pets this Halloween (opinion) | TahoeDailyTribune.com

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Niki Congero: Protect your pets this Halloween (opinion)

Hunter is a very sweet 5-year-old kitty. He is having a hard time at the shelter and is very scared. He would love to go home with someone who is loving and can give him the time he needs to love back. Come visit Hunter at The El Dorado County Animal Services, 530-573-7925. For spay-neuter services and other support, call the Lake Tahoe Humane Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals at 530-542-2857.

Hunter is a very sweet 5-year-old kitty. He is having a hard time at the shelter and is very scared. He would love to go home with someone who is loving and can give him the time he needs to love back. Come visit Hunter at The El Dorado County Animal Services, 530-573-7925. For spay-neuter services and other support, call the Lake Tahoe Humane Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals at 530-542-2857.

Every year around Halloween the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center gets flooded with calls from pet owners who are worried about what their pet has eaten. In order to avoid this worry, and to help you prepare for the big night and weeks before, we put together a list of the most common issues encountered.

Lock candy safely away. Kids love to stash candy in their rooms, but a dog’s keen sense of smell will lead him to even the most cleverly hidden treasure. Contact a veterinary professional right away if your pet does get into Halloween candy, especially if it contains chocolate or is sugar-free and contains xylitol.

Don’t leave glow sticks lying around. Glow sticks are used to help keep kids safe while they are out in the dark. Pets (especially cats) find these glow sticks to be a lot of fun as well, and vets commonly get calls about pets puncturing the sticks. While most of them are labeled as non-toxic, they do have an extremely bitter taste and often pets who bite into them will start drooling and racing around the house. A little treat or sip of milk will usually stop the taste reaction.

Keep your pet identified and visible. There are a lot of extra people on the streets at Halloween, and that combined with strange costumes can spook pets and cause them to bolt. If you take your pet out after dark, make sure he or she wears a reflective collar and is securely leashed. And make sure your pet has proper identification on the collar.

Calm your pet. Not only will your door be constantly opening and closing on Halloween, but strangers will be dressed in unusual costumes and yelling loudly for their candy. This, of course, is scary for our furry friends. Dogs are especially territorial and may become anxious and growl at innocent trick-or-treaters. Putting your dog or cat in a secure room away from the front door will also prevent them from darting outside into the night … a night when no one wants to be searching for a lost loved one. Keeping your pet away from trick-or-treaters may do the trick; but if you think more will be needed be sure and speak with your vet well in advance about options to help calm your pet.

Check those costumes. Costumes can be fun for the whole family. If you are planning on dressing up your best bud, ensure that the costume fits well and isn’t going to slip and tangle the pet or cause a choking hazard if chewed on. Never leave a costumed pet unattended.

Lastly, keep your outdoor cats inside several days before and several days after Halloween. Black cats are especially at risk from pranks or other cruelty-related incidents. In fact, many shelters do not adopt out black cats during the month of October as a safety precaution. Fortunately the Lake Tahoe Humane Society and El Dorado County Animal Services (our local county animal shelter) does a great job of screening adoptees and would never let any animal go to a bad home.

Hoping everyone follows these tips and has a safe Halloween.

Hopeful Henry is a column managed by Niki Congero, executive director of Lake Tahoe Humane Society & S.P.C.A. Submit questions or letters via e-mail to AskHenry@LakeTahoeHumaneSociety.org or by mail to P.O. Box PET South Lake Tahoe, CA 96158. For more information, visit http://www.Facebook.com/LakeTahoeHumaneSocietySPCA, http://www.Facebook.com/Hopeful.Henry or http://www.twitter.com/LtHumaneSociety.