Hybrid homes available for sale | TahoeDailyTribune.com

Hybrid homes available for sale

Mandy Feder
mfeder@tahoedailytribune.com

Five homes are available for sale in a 14-home subdivision featuring new, free-standing houses in a gated community located down the hill from Heavenly and walking distance to the casinos .

Shepherd's Trail boasts four bedroom, three bath homes, each approximately 1,392-square-feet and each with a two-car garage. Features include two master suites, high-grade kitchen appliances, granite counters, wood cabinetry and vaulted ceilings.

The homes are a hybrid of on-site and modular construction. The ground floor is constructed first and the modular portion is brought in and placed on top. The finish work is then completed on site. The subdivision replaces what used to be a mobile home park, which the developers demolished and received the rights to build these new units.

Currently there are five homes available for sale. Two are finished and three are in process to be completed within the next 60 days. The subdivision will have a total of 14 homes.

There is a common picnic and barbecue area in the center. There is a homeowners association and the fees of $190 per month include water, sewer, refuse, common grounds maintenance, snow removal and the gate.

The starting price for the homes is $369,000. Molly Blann and Maureen Leonard of RE/MAX Realty Today represent the new development.

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The public is invited to an introductory event on Saturday from noon to 3 p.m.

According to Blann, the prior owner began this process in 2006 by working with the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA). The property originally had 21 mobile homes on it. It was downsized and approved for 15 new units to be built. The current owners decided to build just 14 units and allow additional spaces for guest parking. The property went into foreclosure with the prior owner in 2008. The current owners, Sterling Homes (Shepherds Trail LLC) purchased it in 2010 and finished the process and all of the lots.

"They worked directly with the State of California and TRPA," Blann said. "The state of California was involved because it was, and is still considered a mobile home park by the state."

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