Sugar Bowl plans for ski, boardercross course | TahoeDailyTribune.com

Sugar Bowl plans for ski, boardercross course

Seth Lightcap

Following in the footsteps of BMX’s Summer Olympic debut in Beijing, the equally elbow-bumping, pedal-to-the-floor events of skiercross and boardercross will make their Winter Olympic debut at the 2010 Olympic Games in Vancouver.

While the Lake Tahoe area has always been a hotbed for top racers in these hard-nosed disciplines, it’s now on track to be one of the nation’s finest training grounds for these Olympics sports as well.

Sugar Bowl Ski Resort has recently unveiled plans to build and maintain the country’s only season-long, event-specific training course for skiercross and boardercross athletes. Located off the Mount Judah Express quad chair, the new course will take over the Tunnel 41 run skiers’ right of their existing Switching Yard Terrain Park.

The course will be designed by Sugar Bowl Terrain Park Manager JP Martin and Sugar Bowl ski ambassador and U.S. Ski Team skiercross athlete Daron Rahlves. Both are thrilled with the announcement.

“With an X Games skiercross gold medalist on our team in Daron and a great race program already, this training course will be a perfect extension of what were known for,” Martin said. “We’re excited to give local racers and the public a safe place to practice this new racing style.”

While Rahlves is understandably excited for the new home-turf opportunities, his first thoughts echoed Martin’s excitement for the public.

Recommended Stories For You

“Sugar Bowl is making a major commitment that will not only benefit pros, but visiting skiers who will be able to improve their skills in varied terrain,” Rahlves said. “It will be a really cool run that’s not just jumps and a great place to go head to head with your buddies.”

Initial plans are to build a “sprint” course that will have enough linked features to give racers a condensed run of approximately 35 seconds at top speed. Terrain obstacles will include long sets of rollers, banked corners and jumps that will require practiced technique to master.

“This won’t be a course where you just launch out of the gate and tuck it to the bottom,” Martin said. “Our intention is to build a course that rewards strategy.”

Being able to focus his training on start skills and cornering is why Rahlves proposed the course construction to Sugar Bowl in the first place.

“I pushed the idea because I want to be more prepared this season,” he said. “The last two years I’ve just shown up to ski and ended up being the last guy out of the gate. I’ve had to work hard and make risky moves to get my way to the front.”

Competing in just seven national skiercross events this season, including two World Cups, the X Games and 48 Straight, Rahlves hopes his time spent training at Sugar Bowl will keep him competitive with racers taking on more committing schedules.

“When I show up at a national race having skied just one event, while other guys have skied six, my opportunity to go to Sugar Bowl and practice starts and other techniques will help me in a huge way,” Rahlves said.

The start gate on the course will drop as soon as natural snow conditions permit, but Martin hopes to use some snowmaking and a lot of snow farming to get racers up to speed as soon as possible. Once established, the development potential of the course is open-ended.

“The possibilities of expanding the idea are limitless,” Martin said. “There will be nothing on the West Coast like it. We’ll do as much as we can with the terrain and the snow available.”

Go back to article