Gather with Diane McCormack, ‘A Year of Remembrances … A Love Story’ author | TahoeDailyTribune.com

Gather with Diane McCormack, ‘A Year of Remembrances … A Love Story’ author

TRUCKEE, Calif. — Friends of the Truckee Library and the town of Truckee invite the public to celebrate the publication of "A Year of Remembrances … A Love Story" on Wednesday, Dec. 11, 5:30-7 p.m. at Truckee Town Hall with author Diane McCormack. Diane, wife of longtime resident, former Truckee Mayor, and community supporter Don McCormack will give a short presentation, answer questions, and sign copies of her just-released book about their 32 years together. Diane's story about love, loss, grief, survival, town politics, Harley Davidsons, dog shows, and dachshunds is an ode to Don and her life with him: "An incredible human being. An observer of human nature. A leader in town politics. A teacher to some. A mentor to many. A friend to all. Especially, an incredible husband. The legacy he left is eternal." During their years in Truckee, while Diane became active in showing her long-haired dachshunds, Don became involved in Truckee civic groups and politics — his greatest achievement being town of Truckee Mayor for two terms between 1996 and 2001. The back cover is a tribute by Kathleen Eagan, another former Truckee Mayor, "The heartfelt story of a vibrant and adoring marriage, the deep sorrow of unexpected loss, and the will to make the most of life going forward." "At times, my heart was too heavy to continue; tears would be falling into the keys of my laptop faster than I could wipe them off," said Diane. The McCormacks have been strong advocates and supporters of the library and a portion of proceeds from book sales will be donated to Friends of the Truckee Library. "A Year of Remembrances … A Love Story" was published by Jack Bacon & Company in Reno, Nev. Refreshments will be served at the signing, and everyone is welcome.

Story time begins again

The South Lake Tahoe Branch Library, in partnership with First Five of El Dorado County, will continue “Let’s Read Together” Story Times at 10:30 a.m. March 24. The featured book is titled “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” by Eric Carle. This series of story time workshops provides fun for children age 2 through 5 and teaches their adults exciting ways to promote early literacy skills in the children. Parents are children’s first and foremost teachers and are essential to the development of literacy skills in young children. Through hands-on, interactive games and activities, the adults will learn how to promote the development of skills that prepare children for success in school. Families may sign up for this individual session or for all three remaining sessions. Each month one book will be featured, and each family attending will take a new copy of the book home, along with a family booklet for more fun. To sign up for “Let’s Read Together” Story Time call (530) 573-3185 or visit the library at 1000 Rufus Allen Blvd. Space is limited. The library is open from 10 a.m. too 8 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday.

Program promotes children’s reading

There is magic in books. Through books young children can meet a blue horse, dine with a very hungry caterpillar, find a lost duckling and ride a magical bus. The Family Storyteller is a family literacy program built upon children’s literature and video tapes, which model parent/child book reading. The workshops are designed for parents and their preschool or beginning reader children, ages 3 to 7. Parents will learn how to maximize reading with their young children. The emphasis of this program is on modeling carefully selected book reading techniques such as previewing the book, reading with expression, labeling and asking questions. Families will receive a free book each week and do activities together. A home activity packet will be given to provide ideas and materials to do more activities through the week. The workshops will be from 6 to 7 p.m. each Tuesday from Feb. 25 through April 9 at the Lake Tahoe Branch Library in Zephyr Cove Park. Space is limited. To register call Kay Vibe at (775) 588-4574 or Carol Rapacz at (775) 588-6411.s The Family Storyteller is a free program offered through the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Douglas County School District and Douglas County Public Library.

Young readers cast their votes

When the votes were tallied, Barney Saltzberg’s “The Soccer Mom From Outer Space” was selected by Bijou Community School students as their favorite book. At Tahoe Valley Elementary, Linda Wysong’s class picked “Island of the Ants,” by Eva Ibbotson, while students at Sierra House Elementary School chose “Click, Clack, Moo: Cows that Type” by Doreen Cronin and Betsy Lewin. Three South Shore schools participated in the annual California Young Reader Medal program. Coordinated by reading coach Debbie Wright at Bijou, the program encourages children to read from a selection of five storybooks over the course of a year and pick which one they think is the best. From September to March students read the nominated books and voted for their favorite. Teachers and librarians provided ballots for students and then submited their school or library’s results to the statewide committee. The votes are tallied and submitted to the state program, with winners announced in May. Since its creation in 1974, millions of California children have nominated, read and voted for the medal winners. “It instills in students that reading can be fun,” Wright said. “Our goal is to make students lifelong readers. Reading can take you places and it can be something pleasurable that you will always have with you for the rest of your life.” The program is sponsored by the California Association of Teachers of English, the California Library Association, the California Reading Association and the California School Library Association. A committee of representatives from each organization coordinates the reading activities at the state level and picks the books for the children to read. Last year, Bijou students met the author of “The Soccer Mom from Outer Space,” Barney Saltzberg. So, when it came time to pick their favorite book among the five, the students remembered Saltzberg and his presentations. Bijou students Juan Vasquez, 7, and Annie Jensen, 8, disagreed on their favorite book. Juan said he liked “The Soccer Mom From Outerspace” because he likes soccer and it was a story that reminded him of his mom. Annie, on the other hand, preferred the book “Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type” because it was easy to read and because it kept her in suspense. “It was a funny and was funnier all the way to the end,” Annie said. — Jeff Munson can be reached at (530) 542-8012 or jmunson@tahoedailytribune.com

Guidelines offered in short book

It could be called the Bible of BMPs. However, those who worked on the new “Home Landscaping Guide for Lake Tahoe” believe the 150-page book is much more than that. “This is an extremely valuable resource for property owners,” said Pam Drum, spokeswoman for the bistate Tahoe Regional Planning Agency. “It contains a wealth of information not only about BMPs but also how to create a very attractive landscape that includes BMPs and has little or no negative impact on the environment.” After more than two years of work by TRPA, the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and others, 10,000 copies of the landscaping guide have been printed. Twelve chapters comprise the book and cover such topics as controlling erosion, protecting stream zones, using defensible space to reduce the threat of wildfires, planting native vegetation, controlling pests and maintaining BMPs, or Best Management Practices. Property owners working on their land have, for more than a decade, been required to implement BMPs, which include installing driveways, building rock-lined trenches or putting in native plants. TRPA also has a BMP-retrofit program, where all Lake Tahoe residents are going to have to install BMPs on their property. The idea is that BMPs will control stormwater runoff, filtering sediment out before it reaches the ever-murkier Tahoe. This is the first comprehensive handbook about the best ways to landscape at Tahoe. “Throughout the book we talk about integrated landscaping,” said John Cobourn, one of the book’s team leaders for the Cooperative Extension. “All the different chapters show different facets or angles of landscaping. The idea of integrated landscaping is to integrate those different facets.” A Nevada Division of Environmental Protection grant paid for the production of the book, and TRPA’s Drum said, while the books will be given out for free, donations will be accepted to pay for a second printing. A spring series of landscaping workshops are now under way, and the books are available from those classes. Residents also can get the book at TRPA’s office, 308 Dorla Court, Round Hill. Upcoming classes: n Forest Health; Fuels Management – Wednesday at Round Hill Fire Protection District; Friday at Aspen Grove Center, Incline Village n Residential Best Management Practices for Contractors – April 14 at North Tahoe Conference Center, Kings Beach; and April 21 at Zephyr Cove Library n Pest Management and Bark Beetles – April 27, Truckee Meadows Community College, Room 211, Incline Village Information: John Cobourn at (775) 832-4150 or Jason Shackelford at (530) 573-2757

Developer trades open space fee for undisputed project

By David Bunker Tribune News Service TRUCKEE – An agreement that would clear the path for more open space has been reached between an environmental group and backers of the town’s largest proposed development. East West Partners, the developer of Gray’s Crossing, will use a fee on all its new homes that will raise $6 million to buy open space in the Truckee area. Under the agreement, the Mountain Area Preservation Foundation has promised not to file, endorse or support any challenges to the Gray’s Crossing project recently approved by the Truckee Town Council. Gray’s Crossing, a project of 725 homes and more than 38,000 square feet of office and retail space, is proposed north of Interstate 80 along State Route 89 north. The environmental group had objected to aspects of the project – most notably the construction of a golf course on the site. East West Partners had already agreed to a one quarter of 1 percent fee in the development agreement approved by the town council. Each time a residential property is sold in Gray’s Crossing, one half of 1 percent of the sale price will be donated to the Truckee Donner Land Trust for the purchase and maintenance of open space. “As Truckee continues to grow, a major concern of MAPF has been permanently and intelligently protecting open space,” said Stefanie Olivieri, president of the foundation, in a written statement. “In that spirit, we are satisfied that we are able to fashion an agreement that works for East West Partners and the people of Truckee.” After 15 years, East West Partners will have the flexibility to lower the transfer fee rate back to one quarter of 1 percent and allocate that money to other causes such as education, recreation or the library.

What’s happening

Lake Tahoe Community College Yoga Club invites the community to an organic bake sale fundraiser. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 13 and 14 in the LTCC commons area. All proceeds will benefit LTCC yoga classes. Story time is fun for families The South Lake Tahoe Branch Library, in partnership with First Five of El Dorado County, is continuing “Let’s Read Together” Story Times, which resumes at 10:30 a.m. March 3. The featured book is titled “Is Your Mama a Llama?” by Deborah Guarino. This series of story time workshops provides fun for children age 2 through 5 and teaches their adults exciting ways to promote early literacy skills in the children. Parents are children’s first and foremost teachers and are essential to the development of literacy skills in young children. Through hands-on, interactive activities and games, the adults will learn how to promote the development of skills that prepare children for success in school. Families may sign up for each individual session or for all four remaining sessions. Each month one book will be featured, and each family attending will take a new copy of the book home, along with a family booklet for more fun, skill building activities at home. To sign up for “Let’s Read Together” Story Time call (530) 573-3185 or visit the library. Space is limited. The library is at 1000 Rufus Allen Blvd. The library is open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Stories, crafts at library event The Lake Tahoe branch of the Douglas County Public Library will present Saturday stories and crafts at 3 p.m. March 17. The event will take place at the library, 233 Warrior Way in Zephyr Cove. Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with Miss Carol. Wear green and have fun creating shamrocks and leprechauns. Children age 3 years and up will use stickers, glue and glitter to decorate their craft. Young children should be accompanied by an adult. Call (775) 588-6411. Seniors to meet; reserve a spot The Tahoe Douglas Seniors will meet at 11:45 a.m. March 14 in Harrah’s convention center. Reservations are required and the reservation deadline is March 7. To make a reservation and for more information call (775) 588-5140.

More than just a quiet place with books

One of the best places to find information on the South Shore is about to reach a milestone. The South Lake Tahoe Branch of the El Dorado County Public Library will celebrate 20 years at 1000 Rufus Allen Blvd. on Wednesday at 2 p.m. While it shared many temporary homes before it came to rest at its the permanent location, the library is considered a well that quenches South Lake Tahoe residents’ thirst for knowledge. “It has evolved into a place where all ages and all walks of life from the South Shore come to learn,” said Sally Neitling, branch manager of the library. With 64,000 books located throughout the 12,000-square-foot building, along with a computer lab, a children’s reading room and plenty of space to sit comfortably for leisurely reading or serious research, the library has become a part of the South Shore’s culture. Everyone from carpenters to scientists, environmentalists to hobbyists use the library, which sees more than 10,000 books checked out monthly, Neitling said. There are more than 20,000 valid library cards that have been issued on the South Shore. And it’s not just books that people check out. The library offers an environmental studies center, a Spanish language book collection, a rare book collection and an online library catalog. Soon library patrons will be able to log onto the Internet from home to check their library accounts, extend due dates and reserve books. The library also offers thousands of books on tape, as well as VHS tapes and DVDs. The nine-station computer lab gets a ton of use, especially by young adults surfing the Internet. “We see a lot of people who are here working that live out of the county who come in to use the lab either to send or check their e-mails,” Neitling said. “If you think of all the changes in technology over the past decade, we would have never dreamed of having a computer lab 20 years ago.” Librarians also serve as reference resources. They will research just about any question. Reference Librarian Mitch Ison says he gets requests every day, from basic questions on environmental policy to unusual questions about popular culture. Despite the popularity of the Internet, Ison says reference librarians are still essential. “Requests for information still come in, and we do use the Internet to find the information people are looking for,” he said. “I look at it this way: If I’m repairing my car by myself and I have a manual, it would take me days to fix what the problem is. Whereas if I take it to a mechanic who knows what he’s doing, it will only take a couple of hours.” The First Lake Valley branch was opened on Feb. 6, 1948, by librarian Bertha Hellum. It was located in the home of Robert and Jan Wakeman. Volunteers ran it two afternoons and one evening each week. Forty-six people had library cards. The library moved in the fall of 1948 to the home of Pat and Glenn Amundson. It was accessible to elementary schoolchildren once a week and to the general public three afternoons a week or when someone was home. Pat Amundson earned $5 a month for operating the library. In the 1950s, the library was moved several times. First, it went to the judge’s chambers of the El Dorado County Jail. During the summer, the library occupied school classrooms, and then returned to the jail when school started. At one time it was housed at the American Legion Hall, and then in 1958 it moved to a more permanent branch, called the Lake Valley branch at 3058 Highway 50. Years later, it would move to its permanent facility that was dedicated April 16, 1983. Since then circulation and the issuance of new library cards has tripled. There are five full-time employees, four part-timers and 12 volunteers. Its budget last year was $536,807. — Jeff Munson can be reached at (530) 542-8012 or jmunson@tahoedailytribune.com

Library continues beginning computer classes

The South Lake Tahoe Branch Library will continue its series of introductory computer classes in April. All classes are free and will be at the library, 1000 Rufus Allen Blvd. The Computer Basics class will be held 10 a.m. to noon April 10. The class will feature computer basics and cover the fundamentals necessary to operate a computer, including terminology and common commands. Introduction to the Internet will be 10 a.m. to noon April 17. Participants will learn to use Web site addresses, search engines and other tools for surfing the Internet. E-mail 101 will be from 10 a.m. to noon April 24 and discuss sending and receiving e-mail, using an address book and opening e-mail attachments. Space for all classes is limited and early registration is advised. To register, call (530) 573-3185.

Library continues beginning computer classes through April

The South Lake Tahoe Branch Library will continue its series of introductory computer classes in April. All classes are free and will be at the library, 1000 Rufus Allen Blvd. The Computer Basics class will be held 10 a.m. to noon Saturday. The class will feature computer basics and cover the fundamentals necessary to operate a computer, including terminology and common commands. Introduction to the Internet will be 10 a.m. to noon April 17. Participants will learn to use Web site addresses, search engines and other tools for surfing the Internet. E-mail 101 will be from 10 a.m. to noon April 24 and discuss sending and receiving e-mail, using an address book and opening e-mail attachments. Space for all classes is limited and early registration is advised. To register, call (530) 573-3185.