Squaw Valley contributes six figures to challenge town effort | TahoeDailyTribune.com

Squaw Valley contributes six figures to challenge town effort

OLYMPIC VALLEY, Calif. — While the group aiming to create the town of Olympic Valley looks to comply with state political regulations, Squaw Valley Ski Holdings is contributing money and legal services to a group challenging the incorporation effort. Save Olympic Valley, a coalition of valley residents, business owners and property owners, has expended $183,053.59 between Jan. 1 and May 31, with major funding provided by Squaw Valley Ski Holdings, according to Fair Political Practices Commission forms filed with Placer County Elections. "Squaw Valley Ski Holdings has a vested interest as anyone in the future of Olympic Valley, and has made public that it does not support the efforts … to incorporate Olympic Valley into a new city," said SOV treasurer Sean Welch. "As such, it has contributed to Save Olympic Valley as a concerned party to oppose the creation of a new city." The company that owns Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows ski resorts has contributed $100,000 in monetary contributions and $30,256.58 in non-monetary contributions ranging from food and beverage to legal services and consulting to SOV. "While it may be a legal entity, Squaw Valley Ski Holdings considers itself not only to be a full-time resident, but one of the founders of what people today call Olympic Valley," said Welch, who's a partner with Nielsen Merksamer Parrinello Gross & Leoni LLP. "On top of that, it is the largest employer and the owner of over 40 percent of the land of the proposed new city of Olympic Valley." 'IGNORANCE IS NO EXCUSE' Olympic Valley residents filed a Fair Political Practices Commission complaint against IOV in May, listing the group's failures to file a statement of organization, disclose financial contributions for at least five months and include disclaimers on campaign advertisements. As of Wednesday, the complaint remains under "active investigation," said FPPC communications director Jay Wierenga. IOV was unaware of the filing requirements until the FPPC complaint was filed, according to previous reports. "Ignorance is no excuse," said Tom Day, IOV board member. "We put blame on no one but ourselves, and we're moving forward." In the months since the complaint was filed, IOV has been working with its attorney to come into compliance. At the end of May, IOV filed a statement of organization. As for finances, the group has raised just under $100,000 through fundraising and a crowdfunding campaign, said Day, adding that the situation with donation disclosures is being sussed out. Last December, IOV made a $25,000 deposit to Placer County's Local Agency Formation Commission to cover staff time and materials. At a June 11 LAFCO meeting, Folsom-based Citygate Associates was awarded a contract not to exceed $51,750 to prepare a comprehensive financial analysis on the proposed town to determine if it is fiscally viable. While Citygate Associates will work for LAFCO, its analysis will be funded by IOV. A request by IOV to pay the contract in installments was denied by LAFCO at a Wednesday hearing, said Kristina Berry, executive officer of Placer County LAFCO office. As a result, the grassroots group will have to fund the analysis up-front. FOLLOWING THE MONEY An initial fiscal study commissioned by IOV for $10,000 found the town would be financially viable, something that's been heavily scrutinized and debated by Squaw Valley Ski Holdings and Squaw Valley CEO Andy Wirth. According to IOV, it will cost roughly $105,000 to incorporate the town, a figure that includes its initial fiscal analysis, the LAFCO deposit, the comprehensive fiscal analysis, attorney fees and other expenses. However, one expense not factored into that total is the potential cost of an environmental analysis that IOV would have to fund. Berry said IOV is not exempt from such an analysis, but how in depth it will be is yet to be determined. Taking that potential expense into account along with accrued expenses, Day said the $105,000 estimate is believed to be low at this time. Regarding the amount of money spent by SOV questioning incorporation, Day said he is alarmed. "To see so much resentment before accurate facts come back from LAFCO is alarming," he said, referring to eventual findings of the final financial and environmental analyses. If LAFCO approves incorporation based on those findings, an election among Olympic Valley registered voters would follow, in which a simple majority — more than 50 percent — must vote in favor for it to become a town.

Squaw Valley working on updated expansion proposal

Squaw Valley is reworking its proposed 101.5-acre capital improvement plan for an expanded village. The updated plan will take into account comments received at more than 200 meetings Squaw officials have held with local organizations, groups and individuals, said Chevis Hosea, vice president of development for Squaw Valley. Further, feedback has been received from more than 1,500 people who have visited the expansion model set up at the resort's village. "Many groups in the Tahoe region have shown their willingness to engage in a community dialogue, and their voices will be reflected in the revisions of our plans," Hosea said. "We are very thankful for their feedback and hope more groups will join our conversation." There is no release date for an updated plan, a Squaw spokesman said this week, and specific changes were not revealed. The current plan, which outlines the addition of 1,093 lodging units, 47,000 square feet in commercial space and new amenities at the west end of Squaw Valley, has drawn criticism. Sierra Watch recently came out against the proposal, citing concerns with its size and scope. "It clearly doesn't fit into Squaw Valley," said Tom Mooers, executive director of the regional conservation organization based in Nevada City. Similar concerns have been expressed by the Friends of Squaw Valley, a grassroots group of locals and longtime Olympic Valley residents. "We acknowledge the existing village needs to grow and improve," said Ed Heneveld, a member of the Friends of Squaw Valley steering committee and a 35-year Olympic Valley resident. "The … project as currently proposed would be too dense, too large and out of scale with the acreage available. … The end result would be an urbanized city, not a rural alpine village." In a statement, Sierra Watch said Squaw has long been appreciated as a great Sierra setting where natural scenery — its meadow and mountains — provides a unique sense of place. Hosea countered that 95 percent of the proposed development would be on already "significantly disturbed areas," most of which are surface parking lots. "We find it surprising that Sierra Watch would voice its opposition to a sustainable, community-wide planning effort that would redevelop paved-over brownfields," he said. However, concerns regarding traffic, noise, light pollution and water availability, among others, persist. "The (Friends of Squaw Valley) mission statement advocates for development that is environmentally sustainable, economically viable and aesthetically compatible with the existing community character and culture," Heneveld said. Mooers said better development plans are created when conservationists, developers and landowners come together A draft Environmental Impact Report is currently being prepared. The project is proposed in four phases, and is estimated to take between 12 and 15 years to complete.

Squaw Valley working on updated expansion proposal

OLYMPIC VALLEY, Calif. — Squaw Valley is reworking its proposed 101.5-acre capital improvement plan for an expanded village. The updated plan will take into account comments received at more than 200 meetings Squaw officials have held with local organizations, groups and individuals, said Chevis Hosea, vice president of development for Squaw Valley. Further, feedback has been received from more than 1,500 people who have visited the expansion model set up at the resort's village. "Many groups in the Tahoe region have shown their willingness to engage in a community dialogue, and their voices will be reflected in the revisions of our plans," Hosea said. "We are very thankful for their feedback and hope more groups will join our conversation." There is no release date for an updated plan, a Squaw spokesman said this week, and specific changes were not revealed. The current plan, which outlines the addition of 1,093 lodging units, 47,000 square feet in commercial space and new amenities at the west end of Squaw Valley, has drawn criticism. Sierra Watch recently came out against the proposal, citing concerns with its size and scope. "It clearly doesn't fit into Squaw Valley," said Tom Mooers, executive director of the regional conservation organization based in Nevada City. Similar concerns have been expressed by the Friends of Squaw Valley, a grassroots group of locals and longtime Olympic Valley residents. "We acknowledge the existing village needs to grow and improve," said Ed Heneveld, a member of the Friends of Squaw Valley steering committee and a 35-year Olympic Valley resident. "The … project as currently proposed would be too dense, too large and out of scale with the acreage available. … The end result would be an urbanized city, not a rural alpine village." In a statement, Sierra Watch said Squaw has long been appreciated as a great Sierra setting where natural scenery — its meadow and mountains — provides a unique sense of place. Hosea countered that 95 percent of the proposed development would be on already "significantly disturbed areas," most of which are surface parking lots. "We find it surprising that Sierra Watch would voice its opposition to a sustainable, community-wide planning effort that would redevelop paved-over brownfields," he said. In the current proposal, parking would become covered in connection with proposed lodging additions — consisting of hotel rooms, condominium units and fractional ownership cabins. Additional units would give resort-goers a chance to stay overnight, reducing the dependence on ski destination experience by car, Hosea said previously. However, concerns regarding traffic, noise, light pollution and water availability, among others, persist. "The (Friends of Squaw Valley) mission statement advocates for development that is environmentally sustainable, economically viable and aesthetically compatible with the existing community character and culture," Heneveld said. Mooers said better development plans are created when conservationists, developers and landowners come together. "Our hope, whether immediately or in the long term, is (the resort) is open to changes that would really create the best possible plan we can come up with for Squaw Valley," Mooers said. A draft Environmental Impact Report is currently being prepared. The project is proposed in four phases, and is estimated to take between 12 and 15 years to complete. To learn more about the project, visit http://www.squawrenaissance.com.

Squaw expected to submit revised plan in mid-December

OLYMPIC VALLEY, Calif. — Amid continuing feedback, a revised proposal for Squaw Valley's village expansion should be submitted to Placer County next month. "We've really worked hard to get the input of the whole Lake Tahoe region on our plan, with a real focus on environmental stewardship, family oriented experiences and job creation," said Chevis Hosea, vice president of development for Squaw Valley. "The community has been providing valuable input, and we're considering it as we make revisions." While it's unclear what exactly those revisions will be, Alex Fisch, senior planner for Placer County Planning Services, said he thinks they will be "notable." Once the revised plan is submitted — expected in the second week of December — the county will release a notice informing the public of changes, Fisch said. The current plan outlines the addition of 1,093 lodging units, new commercial space and the year-round indoor activity center "Grand Camp" across 101.5 acres. Since the application was submitted to the county in December 2011, it's drawn skepticism, as evidenced in results of a recent survey conducted by project critics Sierra Watch and the Friends of Squaw Valley. Of 220 people who responded to the open-ended question of which factor they least like about Squaw Valley, the proposed village development was the top answer, at 30 percent. When asked what factor survey-takers like most about Squaw, 34 percent answered "mountains, scenery," 33 percent with "skiing, terrain" and 10 percent said "natural environment," out of 282 responders. In total, 330 people took the online survey, which was available from May 30 to Aug. 30. When asked to comment on the survey's results, Hosea said: "To be frank, this is a very limited survey of people who have already been a part of our community input process." Tom Mooers, executive director of the regional conservation organization Sierra Watch, said while the poll is not scientific, it makes a point. "The results are heartening and a little inspiring because it shows there's a deep connection to Squaw Valley based on love of the mountains and outdoors, and that those values shouldn't be lost to irresponsible development," he said. According to previous reports, the development would be built on existing parking lots and disturbed land, and it includes the restoration of Squaw Creek. Despite that, survey results and prior feedback on the plan is sending a message of "not so fast," Mooers said. "Those of us who live in Squaw Valley are reminded every day what a special place this is," added Ed Heneveld, chairman of Friends of Squaw Valley, a grassroots group of locals and longtime Olympic Valley residents. "So we're committed to planning carefully for our future." Moving forward, some elements the Friends of Squaw Valley would like to see in the plan include: A village that maintains an intimate scale, which prioritizes open space, pedestrian gathering places and mountain views. A village that serves as a community center, not just a center of a commercial resort. A village economy that is viable, sustainable and regionally integrative, while not compromising environmental qualities. "We hope that (Squaw Valley owner) KSL's next proposal demonstrates a new respect for the community it has joined, with a plan that supports the values we hold important," Heneveld said in a statement. Since the community input process began, Hosea said Squaw has received feedback from more than 5,000 people who have visited Base Camp, the information base for the village project, and from those who've attended more than 300 meetings held by resort officials.

Squaw models show proposed resort expansion

Looking down at the newest miniature representation of Squaw Valley's proposed expansion, one can see the village at build-out nestled in the valley, surrounded by tree-covered mountains. "The new model is a … resort context model to demonstrate the relationship of the proposed 100-acre village expansion to the entire 6,000-acre Squaw Valley/Alpine Meadows resort," said Chevis Hosea, vice president of development for Squaw Valley. "It also validates the vertical relationship of existing and proposed village buildings to the surrounding mountains." The model, unveiled Aug. 20, also depicts Squaw and Alpine Meadows ski trails and lifts, existing and future structures, and the Sierra's natural landscape. Built to scale, one inch in this 19-foot by 22-foot model represents 130 feet. The old 10-foot by 11-foot model, in which one inch represents 30 feet, remains on display. "(It's) to communicate a comprehensive view — macro and micro — of the proposed village expansion and the relationship to the mountains and existing development," Hosea said, explaining the reason for displaying both models. Cited concerns of the proposed 101.5-acre village expansion center on its size and scope in relation to the valley. The proposal outlines the addition of 1,093 lodging units, 47,000 square feet in commercial space and new amenities to be built out in four phases over 12 to 15 years. "The village expansion is not as large or visually impactful as many think, and when compared to the vast ski areas that it supports, it is actually quite small in scale," said Hosea, when asked what he hopes people take away from the new model. A draft Environmental Impact Report is being prepared on the project and is expected to be published this winter. A final EIR is expected to be published in summer 2014, with Placer County hearings expected in fall 2014. Both models can be viewed from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday, at Base Camp, the information base for the village project, located next to Wanderlust Yoga Studio on First Street in the village. Appointments to view the models can also be made by phone at 530-452-7299 or email at basecamp@squaw.com.

Wary officials weigh Schwarzenegger’s proposed budget cuts

Following the release of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger’s proposed budget plan, officials with local agencies are cautiously breathing a sigh of relief. Faced with a projected $14 billion deficit, Schwarzenegger last week proposed a 10 percent reduction in state programs across the board. But the budget ax doesn’t look like it will immediately affect the Tahoe Truckee area. Local officials, however, remain wary and say they will keep a close eye on the Capital as the governor and state lawmakers forge a final budget agreement in the coming months. “It is a proposal to the legislature, at this point,” said Superintendent Pam Armas of the Sierra State Parks district. “So we’re not exactly sure how it’s going to fall out.” While 48 parks across California are slated to close with the governor’s proposed cuts, none are located in the Tahoe Basin or the Truckee area. In the Sierra district, two state parks are scheduled to be closed to the public ” Malakoff Diggins and Plumas Eureka. “We’re confident that the rest of the parks will be maintained [in a manner] of which they can be proud of,” said Armas. A recommendation to delay gas tax payments to local municipalities, buried in the “depths of that proposal,” could slash funding for street maintenance in the Town of Truckee, said Truckee Town Manager Tony Lashbrook. “That would have an impact on us,” Lashbrook said. “If it’s a delay, it may not be that serious.” While the town’s budgeted revenues from gas taxes is “a big number” ” budgeted at $1.7 million for the 2007-08 fiscal year ” the severity of the recommended delay remains vague, Lashbrook said. The money could be held back for one to five months, and the proposal did not specify how much funding would be withheld. “Could be small, could be big,” Lashbrook said. But the state’s desire for local government funding to bail out the state budget shortfall concerns the town, especially after voters in 2004 approved Proposition 1A to protect local property taxes from state takeaways. Provisions do allow the state to suspend the funds, though the state must repay whatever amount is suspended within three years. “We’re cautiously optimistic they’re going to honor the voter’s direction in Proposition 1A,” Lashbrook said. Since the state has raided local revenue surpluses in years past, local agencies are hoping Proposition 1A will protect their funding. “All we can really talk about is what’s happened in the past,” said General Manager Rick Lierman of the Squaw Valley Public Service District. “And that is that the state has come in and taken a portion of our property tax allocation. … Our property taxes are what we use to operate the district.” Lierman said he is also keeping tabs on Proposition 1A. In the meantime, the Squaw Valley Public Service District will work with the California Special District’s association to safeguard local funds, Lierman said. The North Tahoe Fire Protection District also plans to lobby for dollars at the Capitol in the coming months. Schwarzenegger is proposing a 1.25 percent statewide property tax surcharge to finance an increase in firefighting suppression. The money would be used to purchase additional fire engines, aircraft and bolster firefighting crews. “I’m not sure that that will have any significant impact on North Tahoe Fire,” said Doug Houston, the fire district’s legislative advocate, on Wednesday. “We don’t know how that personnel will be allocated or new fire engines will be placed.” Calfire spokesperson Daniel Berlant said while the governor’s budget proposes closing 20 Calfire stations across the state, none are in the Tahoe-Truckee area. If anything, the governor’s Blue Ribbon fire commission is looking to increase Calfire’s presence in the Tahoe Basin, Berlant said.

Letter: Placer County can learn affordable housing lesson from Truckee

In your report that Truckee will hold their first in a series of workshops on affordable housing, it was stated that 80 percent of Truckee-Tahoe's "below market-rate housing" is located in the town itself. With these workshops, Truckee is continuing to look into policy and development solutions that could possibly address the housing crisis. These actions are a big deal for a municipality of its size, especially when we compare them to the lack of commitment by Placer County to do anything other than rubber-stamp developments that will only increase the need for affordable housing. Approval of both the Martis Valley West and Squaw Valley Village proposals will only further exacerbate the housing crisis. Neither of the developments come close to providing enough housing for the new jobs they will create, let alone adequately address the current lack of housing inventory for working people. I invite Placer County to begin to consider what policy they could put forward in addressing the housing crisis. One possibility is to actually hold developers to the rules the county has already made, such as making project proponents provide housing for half of the new jobs created. The county fell short with approval of Martis Valley West. Instead of providing any housing, Mountainside Partners was instead allowed to pay into some kind of housing slush fund. It fell short with KSL's development, allowing the applicant to provide only a fraction of the housing necessary for the total amount of new employees as a product of the water-park and full build out of the project. Mind you, there is a negligible amount of housing for Squaw employees currently. Thank you, Truckee, for leading by example. We know Placer could learn much from you. Hamish Gowans Kings Beach, California

Incorporating Olympic Valley again found unfeasible; state may review

OLYMPIC VALLEY, Calif. — After fielding critical feedback on its analysis of the economic viability of the proposed town of Olympic Valley, the firm that prepared the report is standing behind its original conclusion. Released July 24, the revised draft Comprehensive Fiscal Analysis prepared by Rosenow Spevacek Group Inc. again reports the proposed town "does not appear to be feasible at this time." "RSG considered all input and performed due diligence as needed, but did not necessarily make the changes as suggested," the company wrote in a cover letter to the CFA, which was signed by the firm's principal, Jim Simon, and associate Jane Carlson. After the first report was released in May, the group spearheading the incorporation effort, Incorporate Olympic Valley, suggested RSG reduce the percentage allocated to a town reserve fund, lower the number of estimated full-time town employees, and decrease the estimated contract cost for certain services, among others. At the time, Fred Ilfeld, chair of Incorporate OV Foundation, a financial arm of IOV, called the preliminary CFA a "deeply flawed report." Meanwhile, Matthew Newman, co-founder of Blue Sky Consulting Group, a consultant for Squaw Valley Ski Holdings — which is challenging incorporation — in June described the first report as using "reasonable assumptions and sound methodology." Blue Sky also suggested some adjustments, such as including a scenario where future development in the town would occur at a slower pace than projected in the preliminary draft CFA, and lowering projected Transient Occupancy Tax collection, according to RSG. In all, of the nearly 20 overarching comment categories identified by RSG, adjustments were only made in a few of them. DIFFERING REACTION This week, Newman said he thinks RSG made the right call in not adjusting certain projections, such as reserve funding, employee count and law enforcement budget, as suggested by IOV. "All three things would have reduced resources to run the town," he said. "Doing so would have made the service level lower than what is currently experienced by the community." Ilfeld, meanwhile, offered a different view. "They have made numerous miscalculations and have made erroneous assumptions, the large bulk of which work against the feasibility of incorporation," Ilfeld said. "… IOV has responded in great detail to RSG's mistakes and erroneous assumptions to correct them, but to little avail. Regrettably, RSG has used our comments not to modify their analysis, but rather to reinforce and justify it." In an Aug. 2 letter to the Placer Local Agency Formation Commission, IOV is requesting the California State Controller's Office review the latest draft CFA report. According to LAFCO's Wednesday, Aug. 12, meeting agenda, the commission will consider the request, along with potentially delaying such a review until after an Environmental Impact Report is completed and a hearing set. Should LAFCO approve IOV's request, the grassroots group will have to identify in writing what it wants the Controller's Office to specifically review, said Kristina Berry, Placer County LAFCO executive officer. Based on that, the Controller's Office will provide a cost estimate for the work. Payment from IOV would have to be received before a review could begin, a process that could take up to 45 days, she said. "It would put a hold on activity on the proposal in the meantime," Berry said. RISING COSTS Alimony-like discussions — referred to as "revenue neutrality negotiations" — with Placer County have not begun, nor has preparation of an environmental impact report. At its July 8 meeting, LAFCO directed IOV to pay Amec Foster Wheeler's $147,000 contract in full by Aug. 12, so work on the EIR can start. "IOV has the ability to fund both the EIR and the Controller's review," Ilfeld wrote in the Aug. 2 letter. "However, it is not willing to commit $147,000 to the preparation of the EIR on an incorporation proposal hobbled by an adverse CFA conclusion." In a follow-up interview, Ilfeld said IOV is hopeful that LAFCO will allow the state Controller's Office to review the draft CFA. "(This) way, we have a better idea of the town's fiscal feasibility before investing a huge sum of money up front for the EIR," he said. "IOV is focussing on this action and has not made any plans should the commission refuse our request to appeal the CFA for review before paying for the EIR." Contingent upon approval, should the state Controller's Office come to the same conclusion as RSG — that the town does not appear financially feasible — IOV will determine then what to do. "Meanwhile, our policy is not to advocate for incorporation of a town that we believe is fiscally not viable," he said. The incorporation process for Olympic Valley officially began in December 2013, when IOV submitted its application to LAFCO.

Squaw Valley unveils scaled-back redevelopment plan

OLYMPIC VALLEY, Calif. — Squaw Valley on Monday unveiled an updated village redevelopment proposal that officials say creates a smaller and more focused plan while respecting the mountain and preserving the historic legacy of the Olympic ski resort. "We basically surgically went through the plan and said, 'How can we solve as many problems as possible?'" said Chevis Hosea, vice president of development for the Olympic Valley ski resort. "… We think we've solved 90 to 95 percent of the issues." While the previous project boundary of 101.5 acres will likely not change significantly with the new proposal, Hosea said, several key adjustments and reductions in this third major reworking of the project include: Reduction in proposed bedrooms from 2,184 to 1,493, a 33 percent decrease. Reduction in lodging units from 1,093 to 750. Reduction in size of Mountain Adventure Camp (previously called Grand Camp) from 132,000 square feet to about 90,000 overall, and 90,000 square feet to 50,000 in footprint. Preservation of the Member's Locker Room and Olympic House, previously slated to be replaced by high-end hotels. Relocating Squaw Kids from its current location by the Member's Locker Room to next door to the year-round indoor, outdoor Mountain Adventure Camp. Maintaining surface parking lots for day skiers; these were previously slated to become enclosed with buildings on top. Limit building heights, with the maximum going from eight stories to seven stories. 'CAUTIOUSLY OPTIMISTIC' While the previous plan was expected to take 12 to 15 years to complete over four phases, the updated project has two phases that could take 20 to 25 years to complete, Hosea said. The extended timeline is due to further collection and study of past regional development. "These new plans reflect the input of literally thousands of our friends and neighbors in the Tahoe region," said Andy Wirth, Squaw's president and chief executive officer, in a statement. "We listened, and we're ready to move forward with a scaled-down development." Past concerns raised by residents and conservation groups included the size and density of the previous plan; impacts to Olympic Valley's natural surroundings; and the project's economic viability, among others. On Tuesday, Ed Heneveld, chairman of the grassroots group Friends of Squaw Valley — one of the more outspoken critics of Squaw's earlier proposal — said he is "cautiously optimistic" about the new plan. "It is so much better than before — what they have on the table now," he said. Another group critical of the project is Sierra Watch, a Nevada City-based regional conservation organization. "Comparisons to (resort owner) KSL's 2011 proposals might be encouraging, but future generations will never even see that plan," said Tom Mooers, executive director of Sierra Watch. "So the issue isn't if the new plan is not-as-bad-as the old one. What matters is if the new plan is good-enough-for — good enough for Squaw, good enough for Tahoe, good enough for us today and good enough for generations to come." Sierra Watch vows to assess the revised plan based on its own merits and impacts, according to a Monday statement from the group. "Like any land use decision-making process, the debate over Squaw's future is going to get complicated — touching on everything from the water quality of Squaw Creek to traffic in Tahoe City," Mooers said. "Our job is to ensure that we never lose sight of the irreplaceable values that give Squaw its incredible sense of place." WHAT'S NEXT This week, the project's draft Environmental Impact Report process will start being informed of the changes, Hosea said. It's uncertain when the draft EIR will be released, said Alex Fisch, senior planner for Placer County Planning Services, on Tuesday. Placer County can expect an updated Specific Plan from Squaw in the first full week of January 2014, Hosea said. Squaw's goal is to begin project construction in the spring of 2016, he said.

Squaw Valley

From the Palisades to Papoose, from Squaw Peak to Squaw Creek, Squaw Valley USA offers world-class skiing and snowboarding terrain to suit the needs of the resort’s every guest. From the mountain-top pool to the pool tables, from the ice pavilion to the tubing arena, Squaw Valley has also worked to develop unique, cutting-edge facilities that offer virtually every option for on and off-slope activities. Through the years, however, the one thing this former Olympic resort has truly yearned for is a comprehensive, cohesive and complimentary base village experience. Well, until now. This season at Squaw Valley USA guests will experience a greatly matured resort. A legendary mountain with terrain to rival any in the nation, if not the world. A place that attracts a passionate clientele of skiing and snowboarding adventurers that have been drawn to this spirited mountain because it inspires greatness. In addition, this year guests will be introduced to Phase II of the new pedestrian Village, further adding to the options and variety available to guests on the lower mountain. This much anticipated development, a collection of deluxe condos, restaurants and shops, was cleverly designed to compliment North America’s most exciting mountain. We hope guests will delight in this marriage of legendary big mountain skiing and snowboarding to the stylish, cosmopolitan, European village nestled beneath it. We think you’ll agree that it’s a great fit. http://www.squaw.com 1960 Squaw Valley Rd. Olympic Valley, CA General Information: Snow phone: 530.583.6955 Fax: 530.581.7106 E-mail address: squaw@squaw.com Squaw Valley USA is just 42 miles from Reno, 96 miles from Sacramento and 196 miles from San Francisco via all weather Interstate 80. Located off Highway 89, between Truckee and Tahoe City on the North Shore of Lake Tahoe.