South Tahoe wrestlers place 10th at Cody Louk Invitational; Valney, Herrera capture gold medals | TahoeDailyTribune.com

South Tahoe wrestlers place 10th at Cody Louk Invitational; Valney, Herrera capture gold medals

WINNEMUCCA, Nev. — The South Tahoe wrestling team made the most of a long trip through wintry conditions last weekend, Dec. 11-12. The Vikings placed 10th at the Cody Louk Invitational hosted by Lowry High, highlighted by senior Michael Valney and junior Andrew Herrera finishing undefeated in five matches over a two-day span. "This tournament draws top schools from all levels in Nevada, Idaho and Oregon," Vikings JV head coach Ryan Wallace said. "It is not pretty, it is a test of fortitude." Valney (132 pounds) and Herrera (195) each won gold medals at the invitational held at the Winnemucca Events Center. Freshman Jose Leon (160) wrestled to a fourth-place finish while senior Blair Binns (220) made the podium with a sixth-place result. In the 132-pound weight class, Valney wrestled as the second seed. He used explosive offense and capitalized on his mistakes to pin four of his five opponents, and reached the finals with wins over wrestlers from Yerington, Elko, Reno (Nev.) and Pershing County. In the championship, Valney wrestled against Lowry's Trace Bell. In the past two seasons, Bell had beaten Valney twice — but the South Tahoe standout reversed the result. After a 4-3 first period, Valney took control of the match by scoring eight points and only allowing one-point escape in the second period. In the third, Valney turned Bell twice to seal a 17-4 victory that delivered the first gold medal of his high school career. "He was better in every position and thoroughly outworked an extremely tough kid who had not lost a match this year," Wallace said. "The most important thing is that he showed the uncommon mental toughness required to stay focused in an environment like that." Herrera used his trademark physicality and defense to finish atop the 195-pound weight class at the invitational. The junior used three quick pins to reach the semifinals, where he prevailed after Pershing County's Ty Arnett suffered an apparent collarbone injury. In the finals, Herrera took to the mat against top-seeded Conner Sievers from Carson (Carson City, Nev.). Sievers dominated each of his opponents on the way to the finals, but had no answer for Herrera's intensity. Herrera had a 2-0 lead after the first period, withstanding multiple takedown attempts and capitalizing on an ill-advised throw attempt with 15 seconds left. The Vikings standout had a 4-0 advantage in the second period when he beat the whistle with a pin that delivered the victory. "Andrew works harder year round than any kid I've seen — he does that to eliminate any doubt that he has earned his results," Wallace said. "It is amazing what can be accomplished when the mind takes control of doubt." Leon finished fourth in a loaded 160-pound weight class that featured Div. I and I-A contenders. The freshman used focus and aggression to reach the semifinals, where he lost 13-5 to Cole Drescher of Spanish Springs (Sparks, Nev.). After losing in the semis, Leon gutted out a 6-5 victory over Osvaldo Ponce of North Valleys (Reno, Nev.). In the consolation finals, he fell 6-5 in a gritty match against Blake Murray of Douglas (Minden, Nev.) — the third straight matchup against a Div. I opponent. "He has a remarkable single-mindedness," Wallace said of Leon. "He makes mistakes but doesn't let them negatively influence his next decision." Binns finished sixth in the 220-pound class, and made a lasting impression on his opponents at the tournament. In the semifinals, the senior came out strong against eventual champion Mikeas Summers of Lowry, but aggravated a knee injury that led to three straight defeats. "Blair put his strength behind good technique, and his dominance in the early rounds earned him the medal," Wallace said. "Even at 220s where everybody is strong, when Blair is at his best his power is overwhelming." South Tahoe took six additional wrestlers to the event, five freshmen and one sophomore that were all unseeded. Kai Poletti (120) went 1-2 while Kody Griffis (106), Skyler Bledsoe (113), Troy Gerrard (113), Chris Chacon (160) and George Rohrbacher (182) each finished winless. "Each of our guys had the opportunity to wrestle a top-tier guy," Wallace said. "You just hope they can absorb the lessons a challenge like that can teach." The Vikings return to action at home on Wednesday, Dec. 16, when they host a dual meet against Dayton and Truckee in the Gold Gym. The meet is scheduled to start at 6 p.m.

South Lake Tahoe wrestlers heading to state championship

A couple of South Tahoe wrestlers will find themselves in familiar territory Friday and Saturday. After taking regional championships in their respective weight classes this past weekend in Truckee, senior Andrew Herrera and sophomore Jose Leon will head to Spanish Springs High School in Sparks to compete in the state championship. Herrera, the lone senior this season for the South Tahoe Vikings, will look to defend his state title in the 195-pound class. He has made it to the state championships all four years at South Tahoe High. "Andrew is the school's first two-time regional champion and he's the first South Tahoe wrestler who has a chance to repeat [as state champion]," said Sean Griffis, Vikings coach. Leon also competed in the state championship in 2016. Unlike last year, however, he enters this year as the No. 1 seed in his class. Leon is competing in the 170-pound weight class. "Jose … had a really good season, Griffis said. "He dominated everyone in our northern league throughout the year." Both athletes are healthy and feeling good coming out of the regional competition in Truckee, Griffis added. Herrera and Leon were not the only two South Tahoe wrestlers who competed in the regional finals this past weekend. Joshua Brackett (106 pounds), Nate Singelyn (113 pounds) and Josiah Brackett (152 pounds) all placed fifth in their weight classes. Kody Griffis (126 pounds) and James Knudson (132 pounds) placed sixth in their classes. As a team, Griffis said he is optimistic given the overall strong performance and the relative inexperience of the young Vikings. "Next year we're looking really strong."

Basketball raffle to fund Class Size Reduction

The Lake Tahoe Educational Foundation is sponsoring a fundraising raffle in its efforts to achieve Class Size Reduction in the Lake Tahoe Unified School District schools. Jerod Haase, a men’s basketball assistant coach at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has donated a keepsake basketball from the Tar Heels’ 2005 championship for the raffle. The ball is autographed by North Carolina players, including Sean May, Raymond Felton, Rashad McCants and Marvin Williams as well as head coach Roy Williams and the entire coaching staff. Haase is a graduate of South Tahoe High School and was a member of the South Tahoe Vikings 1992 Nevada State Championship team. “I appreciate Jerod giving us the ball,” said Carol Haase-Hug of the Lake Tahoe Educational Foundation. “I estimate it is worth in the thousands, but it depends on how valuable the signatures become. I know it’s priceless in North Carolina.” Tickets for the raffle are $5 each or $20 for five. For more information and to purchase tickets, call Haase-Hug at (530) 544-8167. The drawing for the autographed basketball will take place Jan. 20 during halftime of the STHS basketball game. All proceeds will go toward class size reduction in the schools.

Tahoe regional planners approve logging project to remove dead and dying trees

Lake Tahoe regulators have approved the logging of 270 acres north of Bliss State Park on the lake’s west shore to remove dead and dying trees and thin thick stands of fir. It’s the first logging operation approved since last year, when 113 acres owned by the Tahoe City Public Utility District were logged. TRPA fined Menasha Corp., the logging contractor on that job, $160,000 after agency officials said at least 49 old growth trees were felled in violation of regulations designed to protect trees greater than 30 inches in diameter. Company officials maintain they did nothing wrong. The matter is being argued in U.S. District Court in Sacramento. In approving the latest project Wednesday, TRPA officials said they’ve taken steps to guard against similar problems, including the hiring of a full-time forester who will mark trees to be felled and monitor the over-the-snow logging operation this winter. Jesse Jones, the forester, said he has already surveyed the property owned by Tamarack Mutual Water Co. ”There’s a lot of mortality out there and that’s a lot of wood that’s basically firewood,” Jones said. ”I see the project as moving the forest toward a more natural condition.”

Saunders: Ploy of voter preregistration

Editor’s note: Starting in February, Debra Saunders’ column will appear on Saturdays. The usual Saturday columnists will appear on Wednesdays. California state Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson has introduced a bill to allow 15-year-olds to preregister to vote. “I would like to engage young people in the political process at the earliest point in time. If young people get invested in the process earlier, they’ll be likelier to vote,” Jackson said Monday. To my mind, the reason Jackson is pushing this bill is clear. She’s a Democrat. She wants to boost Democratic voter registration. What better way to find Democrats than to recruit kids before they have earned a paycheck or paid a dime in income taxes? Not to mention: They’re not old enough to vote, not old enough to enlist in the military and years from being old enough to buy alcohol or cigarettes. Jackson told me I’m wrong. Her Senate Bill 113 is not a means to increase Democratic ranks. Both parties will have an opportunity to earn the affiliation of new voters. SB 113 should increase the number of young adults who participate in elections. It’s true that younger voters are underrepresented. The Public Policy Institute of California reported last year that 86 percent of adults who are 65 or older are registered; among adults younger than 25, only 54 percent are registered voters. “We aren’t doing a very good job at registering 18-year-olds,” said Mindy Romero, director of the California Civic Engagement Project. OK, but it’s not as if it’s difficult to register to vote in California. You can do it at the Department of Motor Vehicles. You can fill out a form at the library. You can do it online. If young adults aren’t registering, I figure they probably don’t care enough to keep informed. Besides, though younger people are less likely to vote, at least when they grow older and wiser they are likelier to participate. I asked Romero why young adults don’t register. She answered, “Registering has costs to it, even online registration.” Those who don’t register often have “fewer resources.” What does that mean? Romero answered that some adults aren’t familiar with voting. They need outreach to become invested in elections. They need someone or something to “walk them through the system.” She added, “A fundamental element of our democracy is representation.” When too many voters are not represented, democracy suffers. Will Gov. Jerry Brown sign the bill if it makes it to his desk? Jackson thinks Brown will because he’s a “visionary.” I share Romero’s belief that it is not good for democracy if poor people are less likely to vote than members of the middle class. But I do not share Jackson’s belief that California should preregister 15-year-olds, at the Department of Motor Vehicles or elsewhere, to entice them to the ballot box when they’re old enough to vote. (Besides, what if 18-year-olds think they’re registered because of SB 113 but are not on the voter rolls because they moved? “That’s part of the support that they would need,” Romero answered.) To recap: It’s not enough that California makes it easy for citizens to register. The state needs to preregister 15-year-olds in case they don’t register when they’re old enough to vote. Then the state needs to remind 18-year-olds to make sure they’re registered to vote and to vote, because they’re old enough to vote — but not to remember. – Email Debra J. Saunders at dsaunders@sfchronicle.com. To find out more about Debra J. Saunders and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at http://www.creators.com.

School district working on new blend of classes

A schedule consisting of shorter classes and more electives is inching closer to reality for South Tahoe High School. Principal Marcia Kaster told the Lake Tahoe Unified School District Board of Education she would like to see a vote on the preferred proposal, called a “blended four-by-four,” at the next meeting May 10. The proposed school year consists of two terms with four classes lasting 86 minutes. Compared to this year’s layout, it means an additional two classes per school year that will escalate class choice and eventually raise the number of units required for graduation. Kaster said a change is needed. For roughly a decade the school embraced a yearlong block schedule of six 113-minute classes interchanged over two days. Kaster believes the alteration will create a flexible schedule that will boost interest, motivation and attendance at the school. In addition, there is a chance teachers can track classroom production better by seeing students all five school days. “It is an attempt to move forward,” Kaster said. She is in her second year as the school’s principal. Another proposal keeps the revolving block schedule, but shortens it to 101-minute classes with a 45-minute class at the end of the day for academic support classes, study groups, physical education or other classes. The four-by-four schedule can be tweaked for various students and subjects. Those in band can have two options of when to take the class (instead of one) and trade off every other day with an academic subject, such as a foreign language or algebra. Student athletes and yearbook participants can take a shorter 45-minute class at the end of the day, allowing them time to compete or work without missing chunks of instructional time, officials said. In the proposal, at least a pair of academic classes will be taken by students during each of the two 18-week terms. The remaining two classes could be filled with electives, a tutoring period, or, for freshmen, a mandatory course on high school success. Some classes, such as band, advanced drama, chorus, yearbook and Naval Junior ROTC, would last all year. Teachers, in turn, would teach three classes daily with a segment reserved for preparing lessons or grading work. Instructor Bob Grant, a member of the steering committee investigating schedule structures, said changing the schedule is like “rebuilding a car engine” but will motivate students. “The whole thing is filled with incentives,” he said. Students who accumulate credits early can decide to have three periods a day, clearing the way for skiing in the afternoon or arriving at school later. Those who falter will be assigned to tutor rooms or have to repeat the class. At the meeting Tuesday, parent Jeanie Cerceo was concerned that sports participants could continually miss the last class period for games and have to play a never-ending game of academic catch up. While the early out or 45-minute class will help, Kaster said the four-by-four schedule will be an evaluated pilot program that can be tailored next year if approved by the board next month. “Without data it’s just an opinion,” she said.

Ellis, Morrow pace Warriors to first win

OAKLAND – Monta Ellis had 24 points and a season-high 12 assists, Anthony Morrow added 24 points, and Corey Maggette had 20 to lead Golden State to its first win of the season, 113-105 over the Memphis Grizzlies on Wednesday night. Stephen Jackson added 20 points and rookie Stephen Curry had seven points and nine assists for the Warriors, who trailed by 13 points in the first quarter and were outrebounded 46-35. Rudy Gay had 29 points and eight rebounds for Memphis while Allen Iverson added 18 points to become the 16th player in NBA history to reach 24,000 for his career. The Grizzlies lost their third straight and were held under 115 points for the first time since their season-opener. Johnson and Crawford help Hawks beat Kings SACRAMENTO – Joe Johnson and Jamal Crawford had 26 points each to help the Atlanta Hawks beat the Sacramento Kings 113-105 on Wednesday night. Marvin Williams and Mike Bibby each had 13 points for the Hawks (4-1). Kevin Martin, who was playing with bruised right wrist, had 29 points and 11 rebounds and Jason Thompson added 22 points and 12 rebounds for the Kings (1-3). Martin had 25 points going into the fourth quarter, but the Kings, who were ahead by four, allowed the Hawks to surge back to a 93-92 lead after Bibby made a 3-pointer with less than 10 minutes to play. Johnson’s jumper with 3:20 left extended the lead to seven. Martin finally scored his first basket of the fourth on Sacramento’s next possession, but it was too late. Crawford answered with a 3-pointer that put the game away.

WHS looks to even record

Don’t expect the Whittell High football team to overlook the Hawthorne Serpents on Friday night in Hawthorne. After thumping the Serpents 40-6 last year and recognizing that Hawthorne beat North Tahoe 26-12 last weekend, the Warriors don’t plan on taking any team for granted. “Every team matters. I don’t want to go to Hawthorne being overconfident. They are another football team, and they could have some drive to them,” said Whittell coach David Atherton, who lost his head coaching debut to 2A power Lovelock 22-18 last Friday. Besides, the Warriors are 0-1 in the Northern 2A League and looking to get back on track in their pursuit of a playoff berth. “You take away the penalties and all that, we would have won that game,” said Whittell senior receiver Rio Delucia. “We’re not taking (anything) from nobody in this league no more.” Veteran leaders like Cody Nelson won’t allow the team to become complacent or overlook an opponent. “We’ve got the size of the team, the seniors, the juniors and got a full roster, but nothing is going to be handed to us,” said Nelson, a junior running back. “We have to come out and play 100 percent and take everything that we need.” Hawthorne (1-1) lost its season opener to Round Mountain (26-12) the previous week. Atherton said the Serpents are considering dropping to the Class A level, and are playing a mixed Class AA and Class A schedule this season. In Hawthorne’s win at North Tahoe last Saturday, Devonte Bonner scored three second-half touchdowns, including a 78-yarder as the Serpents rallied for the 14-point win. Bonner had the Serpents’ lone touchdown in last year’s game with the Warriors, while Nelson and Roberto Concha-Foley each scored a pair of touchdowns. Game time is 7:30 p.m. Friday.

South Tahoe Snowboad Series results

USASA South Tahoe Snowboard Series Season Opener at Kirkwood on Jan. 4. Giant Slalom (top 3) Open Class Women: 1, Amy Sage, Mammoth, 87.57; 2, Vanessa Lowe, South Lake Tahoe,148.92 Open Class Men: 1, Ari Giovenco, South Lake Tahoe, 73.24; 2, Peter Butcher, San Diego, 94.23; 3, Agustin Murguia, Mammoth, 109.62 Ruggie Girls (7 and under): 1, Julia Mason , Zephyr Cove, 191.26 Ruggie Boys (7 and under): 1, Nicholas Larsen, San bruno, 366.83 Grommet Girls (8 & 9): 1, Natasha Sagucka, South Lake Tahoe, 134.7 Grommet Boys (8-9): 1, Sammy Mason, Zephyr Cove, 95.92; 2, Mika Hight, Zephyr Cove, 99.53 Novice: 1, Jordan Laub, Glenbrook, 100.45; 2, Geoffrey Smith, Placerville, 115.12 Menehune Boys (10-11): 1, Harrison Kramer, South Lake Tahoe, 102.79; 2, Tanner Hart, South Lake Tahoe, 109.15; 3, Cody Horan, Placerville, 161.38 Breaker Girls (12-13): 1, Jamie Anderson, South Lake Tahoe, 92.61 Breaker Boys (12-13): 1, Roger Carver, Placerville, 79.52; 2, Micholas Poohachaoff, South Lake Tahoe, 81.65; 3, David Kapinos, Rohnert Park, 101.55 Youth Women (14-15): 1, Stacie Anderson, South Lake Tahoe, 88.41; 2, Elan Whitney, South Lake Tahoe, 92.86; 3, Colleen Sheehan, South Lake Tahoe, 99.57 Youth Men (14-15): 1, Ryan Bosson, South Lake Tahoe, 81.75; 2, Kevin Cain, Gardnerville, 81.97; 3, Ben Goldenberg, 82.52; Junior Women (16-17): 1, Joanie Anderson, South Lake Tahoe, 86.1; 2, Nicole Ricioli, South Lake Tahoe, 96.39; 3, Jacqueline Smith, Pollock Pines, 98.8 Junior Men (16-17): 1, Jesse Hall, Mt. Shasta, 81.99; 2, Jeff Kaczmar, South Lake Tahoe, 83.06; 3, Nickolay Dodov, Bear Valley, 85.52; Women Jams (18-22): 1, Tess Weathers, Mt. Shasta, 103.15; 2, Lena Jordan, Rescue, 113.4; 3, Christina Vu, El Dorado Hills, 131.77; Men Jams (18-22): 1, Jeremiah Ray, Jackson, 98.76 Senior Women (23-29): 1, Andrea Fotrova, Czech Republic, 118.51; 2, Karin Tuxen, Albany, 121.07 Senior Men (23-29): 1, Lee A. Breshears, Reno, 86.96 Master Women (30-39): 1, Nancy Ng, South Lake Tahoe, 108.89 Master Men (30-39): 1, Adam Neil, Zephyr Cove, 80.15; 2, Risley Sams, San Francisco, 82.64; 3, Benjamin Boussina, Greenbrae, 94.17 Legend Women (40-49): 1, Donna Vano, South Lake Tahoe, 104.81; 2, Zippy Neil, Zephyr Cove, 171.81 Legend Men (40-19): 1, Gordon Moncibais, Benicia, 133.68; 2, Tom Collins, Truckee, 155.01 Kahuna Men (50-59): 1, Len Winkler, Placerville, 112.47; 2, Herbert “Dick” Schulze, Palo Alto, 129.33 SLALOM Jan. 5 At Kirkwood Ski Resort Women Open Class 1. Joanie Anderson, Sierra-at-Tahoe, 81.12 seconds; 2. Vanessa Lowe, South Lake, 113.9. Jam’s (18-22) 1. Tess Weathers, Mount Shasta, Calif., 101.0; 2. Lena Jordan, Sierra-at-Tahoe, 112.75. Senior (23-29) 1. Karin Tuxen, Albany, Calif., 124.31. Master (30-39) 1. Nancy Ng, Sierra-at-Tahoe, 105.11; 2. Carol Anne Giustina, South Lake Tahoe, 133.71. Legend (40-49) 1. Donna Vano, Sierra-at-Tahoe, 105.77; 2. Zippy Neil, Zephyr Cove, 183.65. Girls Ruggie (7 and under) 1. Julia Mason, Heavenly, 170.65. Grommet (8-9) 1. Natasha Sagucks, Sierra-at-Tahoe, 139.88. Breaker (12-13) 1. Jamie Anderson, Sierra-at-Tahoe, 96.06. Youth (14-15) 1. Elan Whitney, South Lake Tahoe, 88.44; 2. Stacie Anderson, Sierra-at-tahoe, 88.85; 3. Colleen Sheehan, Heavenly, 89.32. Junior (16-17) 1. Katie Sheehan, Heavenly, 98.32; 2. Jacqueline Smith, Pollock Pines, Calif., 98.64; 3. Melissa Anino, Heavenly, 126.24. Note: Nicole Ricioli, Sierra, total time not listed Men Open Class 1. Ario Giovenco, Heavenly Snowboard Foundation, 71.31; 2. Agustin Murgula, Mammoth Lakes, 89.11. Jam’s (18-22) 1. Justin Alcantara, Zephyr Cove, 93.47; 2. Tyler Summers, Yreka, Calif., 100.93; 3. Jeremiah Ray, Jackson, Calif., 122.16. Master (30-39) 1. Adam Neil, Zephyr Cove, 82.05; 2. Risley Sams, San Francisco, 85.52; 3. Mick Connolly, Twaine Harte, Calif., 100.94. Legend (40-49) 1. Tom Goldenberg, South Lake Tahoe, 132.29. Kahuna (50-59) 1. Herbert Schulze, Palo Alto, Calif., 168.74. Boys Grommet (8-9) 1. Sammy Mason, Heavenly, 93.13; 2. Mika Hight, Heavenly, 98.19; 3. Jordan Laub, Heavenly, 106.53; 4. Geoffrey Smith, Placerville, 160.37. Menehune (10-11) 1. Tanner Hart, Heavenly, 97.37; 2. Harrison Kramer, South Lake Tahoe, 98.22. Breaker (12-13) 1. Roger Carver, Heavenly, 73.77; 2. Nicholas Poohachoff, Heavenly, 79.89; 3. Aaron Orlick, Carson City, 89.91; 4. Chad Cooney, South Lake Tahoe, 99.67; 5. Jack Lyle, South Lake Tahoe, 106.75; 6. Chase Hart, Heavenly, 107.25. Youth (14-15) 1. Greg Dupree, Heavenly, 74.46; 2. Ryan Bosson, Heavenly, 75.01; 3. Ben Goldenberg, Heavenly, 75.99; 4. Abe Greenspan, Heavenly, 78.62; 5. Brian Galea, Heavenly, 80.04; 6. Kevin Cain, Heavenly, 84.05; 7. Casey Weathers, Mount Shasta, 89.65; 8. Aaron Laub, Heavenly, 101.37; 9. John Retta, Martinez, Calif., 103.97; 10. Russell Kaczmar, South Lake Tahoe, 113.33; 11. Cory Mitchelson, Sierra, 130.61. Junior (16-17) 1. Jesse Hall, Mount Shasta, Calif., 74.98; 2. Nickolay Dodov, Sierra-at-Tahoe, 93.06; 4. Jeff Kaczmar, Heavenly, 121.99.

TCAN newspapers clean up awards

PAHRUMP, Nev. (AP) — Here’s the list of the Tahoe-Carson Area Newspaper winners in the Nevada Press Association 2002 “Better Newspaper Contest,” honored Saturday night at the newspaper organization’s annual convention. Most of the awards are divided into classes: Class II, daily newspapers with circulation of less than 15,000; Class III, weekly newspapers with circulation of 4,000-19,999. Advertising awards are divided into two classes of competition — daily newspapers and weekly newspapers. Community Service First Place: Class III — The Record-Courier (Gardnerville.). Second Place: Class II — Tahoe Daily Tribune. Honorable Mention: Class I — Nevada Appeal (Carson City) Best Spot News Story First Place: Class III — Christy Chalmers, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville). Third Place: Class I — Kurt Hildebrand, Nevada Appeal (Carson City). Best Feature Story First Place: Class III — Melissa Vinitsky, Tahoe World (Tahoe City). Second Place: Class II — Susan Wood, Tahoe Daily Tribune; Class III — Charles Levinson, Tahoe World (Tahoe City). Third Place: Class III — Melissa Vinitsky, Tahoe World (Tahoe City). Honorable Mention: Class III — Katherine Morris, Sierra Sun (Truckee). Best Business Coverage First Place: Class II — Tahoe Daily Tribune Second Place: Class III — The Record-Courier (Gardnerville). Third Place: Class III — North Lake Tahoe Bonanza (Incline Village). Best Business Story Third Place: Class III — Jeff Munson, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville); Best Investigative Story or Series First Place: Class II — Robert Stern, Tahoe Daily Tribune Second Place: Class III — Staff, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville) Third Place: Class III — (tie) Rick Adair, North Lake Tahoe Bonanza (Incline Village) and Jeff Munson, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville); Honorable Mention: Class III — Merry Thomas, North Lake Tahoe Bonanza (Incline Village) Best Local Column First Place: Class I — Barry Smith, Nevada Appeal (Carson City); Class III — Christy Chalmers, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville) Third Place: Class III — Jeff Munson, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville); Best Local Non-Staff Column First Place: Class III — McAvoy Layne, North Lake Tahoe Bonanza (Incline Village) Best Local Sports Story First Place: Class III — Nathan Laver, Tahoe World (Tahoe City) Second Place: Class III — Chuck Smock, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville) Honorable Mention: Class III — Nathan Laver, Tahoe World (Tahoe City) Best Local Sports Feature First Place: Class II — Steve Yingling, Tahoe Daily Tribune Second Place: Class III — Chuck Smock, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville) Third Place: Class II — Darin Olde, Tahoe Daily Tribune; Class III — Nathan Laver, Tahoe World (Tahoe City) Honorable Mention: Class III — Jessica Perry, North Lake Tahoe Bonanza (Incline Village). Best Local Sports Column Second Place: Class II — Steve Yingling, Tahoe Daily Tribune Third Place: Class III — Nathan Laver, Tahoe World (Tahoe City) Best Entertainment Writing First Place: Class III — Karel Delbecq, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville); Best Editorial First Place: Class II — Michael Green, Tahoe Daily Tribune; Class III — Kirk Caraway, North Lake Tahoe Bonanza (Incline Village) Second Place: Class III — Kirk Caraway, North Lake Tahoe Bonanza (Incline Village) Third Place: Class III — Charles Levinson, Tahoe World (Tahoe City) Honorable Mention: Class I — Barry Smith, Nevada Appeal (Carson City); Class II — Michael Green, Tahoe Daily Tribune; Class III — Christy Chalmers, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville). Best Editorial Page First Place: Class III — North Lake Tahoe Bonanza (Incline Village) Second Place: Tahoe Daily Tribune Third Place: Class III — The Record-Courier (Gardnerville). Best Overall Design First Place: Class III — North Lake Tahoe Bonanza (Incline Village) Second Place: Class III — The Record-Courier (Gardnerville) Best Page One Design First Place: Class III — North Lake Tahoe Bonanza (Incline Village) Second Place: Class III — (tie) The Record-Courier (Gardnerville), and Tahoe World (Tahoe City) Third Place: Class II — Tahoe Daily Tribune Best Page Designer First Place: Class III — Travis Ambrose, North Lake Tahoe Bonanza (Incline Village) Second Place: Class III — Keith Sheffield, Tahoe World (Tahoe City) Best Special Section — News First Place: Class III — The Record-Courier (Gardnerville) Third Place: Class II — Tahoe Daily Tribune; Class III — North Lake Tahoe Bonanza (Incline Village) Best Spot News Photo Coverage First Place: Class III — Belinda Grant, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville) Second Place: Class III — Belinda Grant, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville) Honorable Mention: Class I — Rick Gunn, Nevada Appeal (Carson City); Class III — Belinda Grant, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville). Best General News Photo First Place: Class III — Belinda Grant, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville) Honorable Mention: Class III — Michael Okimoto, North Lake Tahoe Bonanza (Incline Village). Best Feature Photo First Place: Class II — Dan Thrift, Tahoe Daily Tribune; Class III — Doug Slater, Tahoe World (Tahoe City) Second Place: Class III — Belinda Grant, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville) Third Place: Class I –Rick Gunn, Nevada Appeal (Carson City); Class III — Belinda Grant, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville) Honorable Mention: Class III — Keith Sheffield, Tahoe World (Tahoe City) Best Multiple Feature Photos First Place: Class III — Belinda Grant, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville) Second Place: Class II — Michael Green, Tahoe Daily Tribune; Class III — Belinda Grant, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville) Third Place: Class I — Rick Gunn, Nevada Appeal (Carson City) Honorable Mention: Class II — Jim Grant, Tahoe Daily Tribune; Class III — Shannon Hall, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville), and Jessica Perry, North Lake Tahoe Bonanza (Incline Village) Best Portrait First Place: Class II — Dan Thrift, Tahoe Daily Tribune; Class III — Doug Slater, Tahoe World (Tahoe City) Third Place: Class III — Jessica Perry, North Lake Tahoe Bonanza (Incline Village) Best Illustrated Photo First Place: Class III — Belinda Grant, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville) Second Place: Class III — Belinda Grant, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville) Best Sports Photo First Place: Class III — Belinda Grant, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville) Second Place: Class II — Dan Thrift, Tahoe Daily Tribune; Class III — Belinda Grant, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville). Third Place: Class III — (tie) Doug Slater, Tahoe World (Tahoe City), and Belinda Grant, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville). Honorable Mention: Class II — Jim Grant, Tahoe Daily Tribune Advertising General Excellence First Place: Weekly Newspapers — The Record-Courier (Gardnerville). Third Place: Daily Newspapers — Tahoe Daily Tribune Honorable Mention: Daily Newspapers — Nevada Appeal (Carson City). Best Large-Space Ad Third Place: Weekly Newspapers — Chris Olesen and Victoria Grathwohl, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville). Best Black-and-White Ad First Place: Weekly Newspapers — Rebecca Roxburgh and Kelly Davis, North Lake Tahoe (Incline Village). Best Spot Color Ad First Place: Daily Newspapers — Robin Gason and Phillip Wooley, Nevada Appeal (Carson City); Weekly Newspapers — Victoria Grathwohl and Chris Olesen, The Record-Courier (Gardnerville). Best Special Section — Advertising First Place: Weekly Newspapers — The Record-Courier (Gardnerville). Second Place: Weekly Newspapers — North Lake Tahoe Bonanza (Incline Village). Third Place: Daily Newspapers — Nevada Appeal (Carson City) Honorable Mention: Daily Newspapers Tahoe Daily Tribune Best In-House Advertising Promotion Second Place: Weekly Newspapers — The Record-Courier (Gardnerville).