Ink Out Loud: Any time of year, you can find it here | TahoeDailyTribune.com

Ink Out Loud: Any time of year, you can find it here

Heaven is under our feet, hell froze over and the rest is history. Two scrappy New Jersey kids in the single-digit age bracket belted out "Take it to the Limit." That day in the early '70s, my brother Steve and I made mad plans to buy a radio station and sing all the songs ourselves. Of course that didn't happen, which is probably a blessing for everyone. Now both nearly 50, the doctor in Maine and the newspaper editor in California, inevitably turn our attention to music after discussing family, weather and politics. "Have you seen any good shows?" Steve always asks me. The Eagles are performing here — the very band that inspired us. We sang lyrics that we knew by heart and much later, grew to understand. It makes sense to see the band with Lake Tahoe as the backdrop. My mother, who lived on the edge of Walden Woods, one Christmas sent me an autographed copy of "Heaven is Under Our Feet." The Don Henley book is a collection of personal narratives written by authors from Kurt Vonnegut to Jimmy Buffett, who committed their time and effort to aid in the preservation of Walden Woods. I read that book at least a half dozen times. During this tour, "History of the Eagles," Henley offers an opportunity at a chance to win VIP tickets to a concert and to the Global Leadership Conference. Proceeds benefit The Walden Woods Project, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to preserving the land, literature and legacy of Henry David Thoreau. I've seen most members of the Eagles in their solo efforts, I have not seen the band together live. I had a ticket to a show once, but it was postponed. I wasn't able to attend the rescheduled show. Steve saw it back East and told me all about it though. I can't wait to tell Steve all about this show, presented in a region that can be best described through Thoreau's writing: "I look down into the quiet parlor of the fishes, pervaded by a softened light as through a window of ground glass, with its bright sanded floor the same as in summer; there a perennial waveless serenity reigns as in the amber twilight sky, corresponding to the cool and even temperament of the inhabitants. Heaven is under our feet is well as over our heads." — Henry David Thoreau, Walden

Steve Miller Band plays Stateline

Rock 'n' roll icon Steve Miller Band brings its collection of irresistible hits to Harveys Outdoor Arena on Thursday, Aug. 18, at 7 p.m. The group kicked off its 2016 tour of North America in June, celebrating Miller's induction into The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. "The Joker," "Jet Airliner," "Abracadabra" and "Fly Like an Eagle" are some of the many well-known songs that make up the band's repertoire. "Running through Miller's catalogue is a combination of virtuosity and songcraft, along with melodic vocals and signature guitar riffs. His parents were jazz aficionados — Les Paul was his godfather — so as a budding guitarist and singer, Miller absorbed valuable lessons from their musical tradition," according to a press release from Big Hassle Media. "With albums like Children of the Future, Sailor and Brave New World, Miller perfected a psychedelic blues sound that drew on the deepest sources of American roots music and simultaneously articulated a compelling vision of what music and society could be in the years to come," according to the release. The San Francisco-based band concludes its summer tour in its hometown on Sept. 4 with a concert featuring Santana, Journey and The Doobie Brothers. Roy Rogers & The Delta Rhythm Kings open for Steve Miller Band. Tickets for the Thursday evening show start at $39.50, plus tax and fees. Harveys Outdoor Arena is located at Highway 50 Stateline Avenue. For more information, visit http://www.ticketmaster.com. — Lake Tahoe Action

Ferrer and Walden announce engagement

Robyn Ferrer and Scott Walden have announced their engagement and plan to be married June 30 in San Antonio, Texas. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Fernando and Rosita Ferrer of South Lake Tahoe. A 1998 graduate of South Tahoe High School, she attended Lake Tahoe Community College and is a student at San Antonio College. She plans to attend UTHSCSA to pursue a dental career. She is employed in the office of Walden Productions. The future bridegroom is the son of Frank Walden of San Antonio and Nancy Holekamp of Boerne, Texas. He is a 2000 graduate of Venice High School and attended Lake Tahoe Community College. He is a student at UTSA in San Antonio, where he is an English major. He is a manager in sales at Walden Productions.

Gangster of Love plays Harveys

STATELINE – He sings of swirling, opaque ideas such as epistemology and pompitus, but he’s still just the plain ole’ gangster of love. After 44 years entertaining the masses with novel, catchy hits, Steve Miller and his ultra-tight band boast thousands of fans to back up the love thang. Since its San Francisco inception in 1967, the Steve Miller Band has hammered out 28 albums while uber-hits like “The Joker” and “Abracadabra” punched the No. 1 spot in the U.S. Over the years, his albums have sold more than 24.5 million copies stateside – which is a lot of plastic – and the band’s “Greatest Hits 1974-78” album has been certified platinum 13 times. While the Steve Miller Band is an iconic remnant of the 1970s Bay Area rock scene, few fans realize that the man himself got his chops in the Chicago blues scene. Born in Milwaukee, the young Wisconsinite formed the Goldberg-Miller Blues Band in 1965 and hit the Chicago club scene, sitting in with legends like Howlin’ Wolf, Buddy Guy and Muddy Waters. A couple years later, Miller headed to California, changed the band name and embarked on the classic rock career he’s known for most. After a 17-year studio hiatus filled largely with concert tours, Miller’s latest albums circle back to those early blues days, with a 2010 release of “Bingo” and this year’s companion CD, “Let Your Hair Down.” Both albums feature the last input of harmonica master, Norton Buffalo, who died in 2009 after playing with Miller for more than 33 years. On his website, Miller refers to the dear friend who died too young as his “partner in harmony.” The albums are filled with blues and R&B covers like “Snatch It Back and Hold It” by Junior Wells, Willie Dixon’s “Wild Thing” and the Jimmy Reed tune “Close Together.” Previously, Steve Miller Band shook hands with the blues idea on “Living In The 20th Century,” the 1986 release that featured other Jimmy Reed songs, and again in 1988 with “Born 2 B Blue.” In a clip on his website, Steve Miller speaks at length about his foray back to the blues. In it, he says, “They’re songs that are the basis of the music I developed and learned to play. I learned these songs as a kid and I grew up and I started playing my own music and writing my own tunes. And these are songs that moved me to become a musician. “I love the lyrics on all these songs. I love the writers. I love the performers that did the originals and we took them and gave them the Steve Miller Band treatment so that they’re still alive. These songs are still there and still knocking people out and rocking the house.” But a true Steve Miller concert can’t be all blues covers, even if Sonny Charles on vocals does hearken sweetly the Buddy Guy sound. If the tour thus far is any example, the Lake Tahoe stop should blend a handful of those recent releases with showstoppers like “Gangster of Love,” “Fly Like an Eagle” and “Take the Money And Run.” At the band’s recent concert in Washington state, SMB ended the night with a lively rendition of “Jungle Love” and a romp through “Space Cowboy.” Still popular after years of play, when Miller breaks into his bag of past hits, he sings them out like they’re comfortable old friends – while each tune still sounds as strong as when it first hit the airwaves. If you go What: Steve Miller Band, with special guest Dave Mason When: 7 p.m. Saturday, July 30 Where: Lake Tahoe Outdoor Arena at Harveys Tickets: $39.50-$125, plus taxes/fees More information: http://www.harveystahoe.com

Obituary — Harvey Arthur Johnson

A memorial service for Harvey Arthur Johnson, 79, a Carson City resident for the past four years, will be at 11 a.m. Aug. 22 at Trinity Lutheran Church in Gardnerville, Nev. Mr. Johnson died Aug. 18, 2003, at his home. He was born Oct. 31, 1923, in Broken Bow, Neb., to James C. and Mary Loretta Johnson. He married Dorothy Irvine Aug. 30, 1946, in Marysville, Kan. Before moving to Carson City he lived in Lincoln, Neb. Mr. Johnson was a professional musician and was the band leader and drummer for “All That Swing.” He was a member of the Trinity Lutheran Church and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. He served in the U.S. Air Force as an air traffic controller. Among his survivors are his wife of 56 years; daughters and sons-in-law, Jan and Lanny Lemburg of Minden, Nev., and Crisy and Dave Wright and Retta and Steve Hall all of Zephyr Cove, Nev.; son and daughter-in-law, Jim and Diane Johnson of Minden; grandchildren, Chad Lemburg, Shell Lemburg, Karen Givich, Casey Wright, Shauna Johnson and Tanya Johnson; great-grandchildren Dalton Lemburg, Lauren Lemburg, Kylie Lemburg and Abby Lemburg; and 12 nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his brother, Louie.

Harrah’s adds another Eagles concert to its outdoor lineup

As it turns out, tickets aren’t “already gone” to see the popular rock band, the Eagles. Harrah’s Lake Tahoe has added another show to its outdoor summer concert series at Harveys in Stateline – Aug. 11, the first performance of the group’s California Tour this summer, the casino announced Monday. Tickets to see Glenn Frey, Joe Walsh, Timothy B. Schmidt and Don Henley in action go on sale Saturday at 10 a.m. through Ticketmaster. “We got a lot of calls. The demand was really good. We wanted to make sure we give the locals the chance. Some said they couldn’t get through, so we just called up the band and added a show,” said Don Marrandino, Harrah’s President of Northern Nevada Operations, referring to the sold-out show slated for Aug. 20. “They’re one of my favorite bands, and I know it’s that way for a lot of people.” The Eagles “Greatest Hits 1971-75” has sold more than 28 million copies, with hits spanning 30 years, including “Take It Easy,” “Desperado,” “Hotel California” and “Already Gone.” Tony Taibi, Henley’s road manager for the Eagles, is convinced the band has stood the test of time because of the harmony in the music. “You hear them driving, and you automatically fall into the music. It tells a story. It touches people,” he said. “It’s been a great run.” The tours have taken Taibi all over the world, including Red Square – not bad for a band which started out in a station wagon. At the time he worked as a printer assistant, Taibi started with the band 31 years ago at a friend’s urging to drive a truck for a Florida gig in 1974. Two years later, he became the stage manager – a far cry from the barber his father almost sent him to school to become. “One thing that gets me is the way the audience sings all the songs back (to the band). It’s spiritual,” he said. Taibi stressed how the band got back together 12 years ago for about the same reason the members took a break from one another. “It’s like a family. And when you see each other 24/7, it can get old, and you just say, ‘Let’s take a break,’” he said. With more acts expected to be added, the Eagles will also play the summer concert arena Aug. 20 – a show that sold out in two days. Loggins and Messina will use the Stateline venue for their first reunion concert slated for July 15. Eight days later, a Chinese mega concert is also scheduled.

Workshop to feature renown sound editor

Youth interested in filmmaking will have the chance to do so during a weeklong class at the Brewery Arts Center where they will receive instruction from experts including a well-known award-winning sound editor. “It was a huge success last year,” said Donna Walden, who will lead the course. “So it’s back by popular demand.” The workshop is part of the Northern Nevada Film Factory, a club of filmmakers and animators. During the course of the week, students ages 12 to 20 will write, edit, produce and act in a film that will be screened on the final day of the workshop. “The demand for kids to learn the art of film is growing,” Walden said. “This age of kids are very proficient with technology. They’re very easy to work with.” John Phillips, award-winning sound editor and designer for Hollywood blockbusters including “Rain Man,” “Mississippi Burning,” “Good Morning Vietnam,” “Hoosiers,” and “Big Business” will be making a guest appearance at workshop. Recipient of a British Academy of Film and Television Arts Award for Best Sound for “Mississippi Burning,” Phillips will be sharing his Hollywood experiences with youth at the workshop. The course begins Monday at the Brewery Arts Center where participants will be divided into groups to create a script. During the five days, they will learn basic animation instruction, acting in a dramatic short film, moderating a documentary, proper operation and care of cameras, editing, and working together as a crew. The workshop will conclude Friday with a screening of their work, which will be open to parents, family and peers. Each participant will leave with a DVD of his or her film. Independent filmmakers Janie Chesney and Brandon Chesney will return to help with instruction. The workshop runs 9:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 9 a.m. to noon Friday. Cost is $250, Northern Nevada Film Club Members receive a $25 discount.

Lake Tahoe’s outdoor music scene booming this summer

The year was 1992. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III was in production. Chi Chi Rodriguez was tearing up the PGA tour. Summer salad mix was on sale at Raley's for 59 cents and Harveys had just completed its outdoor arena. "We're looking at trying to bring to Tahoe events that people will like and that will build the business, and, hopefully, get the community behind these concerts," then-Harveys marketing director Dan Faccinetti said in a 1992 Tahoe Daily Tribune article. Though the arena hosted just two shows that first year, the venue would give rise to Lake Tahoe's most prominent outdoor concert series. Now, hardly a summer night goes by without an outdoor concert somewhere around the lake. This summer, Harveys has a lineup of heavy-hitting artists from Tim McGraw to Phish. The series kicks off June 22 with Steve Miller Band. "The entertainment we're getting is top-notch," said Carol Chaplin, executive director of the Lake Tahoe Visitors Authority. "I would say it's one of the best concert series in Northern California and Nevada." The concert series has hosted renowned bands since the beginning. Legendary concert promoter Bill Graham scheduled The Gipsy Kings and Ringo Starr for the venue's first summer. Over the next 20 years and through one enlargement of the arena, The Eagles, Paul Simon, Stevie Wonder, Journey, Robert Plant and Alison Krauss and Kiss would perform in Harveys' back parking lot. Then came the Phish era. In 2011 and again this year, the prolific jam band took the outdoor stage. Tickets to this year's two shows sold out in less than eight minutes, cementing the arena's status as Lake Tahoe's top outdoor venue. As Harveys Outdoor Concert Series rose to prominence, other outdoor music events began to sprout. MontBleu Resort Casino launched outdoor shows in 2012 and will continue the events this year with big names like Slightly Stoopid and the all-day, all-night electronic music festival called Bass Camp. Then there's the Live at Lakeview series in South Lake Tahoe, the Concert at Commons Beach series in Tahoe City and Music on the Beach concerts in Kings Beach, all featuring local, regional and national acts. But it's not just the quality of the entertainment that brings people to Tahoe for the outdoor shows, Chaplin said. "From the weather perspective, we've had a pretty good run," she said. "People love being outdoors in the evenings. And there are these ridiculous sunsets that always seem to happen. You can't really get that anywhere else, especially while listening to your favorite band."

Lake Tahoe’s outdoor music scene booming this summer

The year was 1992. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III was in production. Chi Chi Rodriguez was tearing up the PGA tour. Summer salad mix was on sale at Raley's for 59 cents and Harveys had just completed its outdoor arena. "We're looking at trying to bring to Tahoe events that people will like and that will build the business, and, hopefully, get the community behind these concerts," then-Harveys marketing director Dan Faccinetti said in a 1992 Tahoe Daily Tribune article. Though the arena hosted just two shows that first year, the venue would give rise to Lake Tahoe's most prominent outdoor concert series. Now, hardly a summer night goes by without an outdoor concert somewhere around the lake. This summer, Harveys has a lineup of heavy-hitting artists from Tim McGraw to Phish. The series kicks off June 22 with Steve Miller Band. "The entertainment we're getting is top-notch," said Carol Chaplin, executive director of the Lake Tahoe Visitors Authority. "I would say it's one of the best concert series in Northern California and Nevada." The concert series has hosted renowned bands since the beginning. Legendary concert promoter Bill Graham scheduled The Gipsy Kings and Ringo Starr for the venue's first summer. Over the next 20 years and through one enlargement of the arena, The Eagles, Paul Simon, Stevie Wonder, Journey, Robert Plant and Alison Krauss and Kiss would perform in Harveys' back parking lot. Then came the Phish era. In 2011 and again this year, the prolific jam band took the outdoor stage. Tickets to this year's two shows sold out in less than eight minutes, cementing the arena's status as Lake Tahoe's top outdoor venue. As Harveys Outdoor Concert Series rose to prominence, other outdoor music events began to sprout. MontBleu Resort Casino launched outdoor shows in 2012 and will continue the events this year with big names like Slightly Stoopid and the all-day, all-night electronic music festival called Bass Camp. Then there's the Live at Lakeview series in South Lake Tahoe, the Concert at Commons Beach series in Tahoe City and Music on the Beach concerts in Kings Beach, all featuring local, regional and national acts. But it's not just the quality of the entertainment that brings people to Tahoe for the outdoor shows, Chaplin said. "From the weather perspective, we've had a pretty good run," she said. "People love being outdoors in the evenings. And there are these ridiculous sunsets that always seem to happen. You can't really get that anywhere else, especially while listening to your favorite band."

Letter to the editor- Good coverage of remote cars

To the editor: My name is Shan Wooldridge. I would like to say thanks for making that RC car article, especially getting it on the front page! Great! Good job! People just don’t understand the fun of RC cars. They’re fun, exciting and full of energy. I think that if all the RC car fanatics in Lake Tahoe went to City Council and voted, then this whole thing would be over. You got good coverage on Scott Walden and the co-owner of Toy Maniacs. All they have to do is put water on the dirt, and no more dust! Well, thanks for making the article. Shan Wooldridge Age 13 South Lake Tahoe