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July 21, 2014
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Projects nab honors for Tahoe Transportation District

Tahoe Transportation District has been recognized by the American Public Works Association, the Society of Outdoor Recreation Professionals, the Lake Tahoe Bike Coalition and the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency for recent projects.

“To be recognized for a consistent level of superior work with three separate projects within the Lake Tahoe Basin makes our entire team proud,” said Carl Hasty, manager of the Tahoe Transportation District. “We’ve had success with our projects because of our ongoing efforts to leverage and maximize public and private partnerships.”

The Tahoe Transportation District’s Stateline to Stateline Bikeway South Demonstration Project was recognized as the best Nevada transportation project under $5 million by the Nevada Chapter of the American Public Works Association.

Lumos & Associates, an engineering firm with offices at Lake Tahoe, nominated the bikeway project for the Nevada award. The award makes it eligible for consideration as a national project of the year.

The newest segment of the Stateline to Stateline Bikeway extends 1.2 miles from Elks Point to Round Hill. Eventually the bikeway will span 30 miles and connect the South Shore to Incline Village.

The Lake Tahoe Bike Coalition also recognized Tahoe Transportation District for its bike path work, giving it a Lake Tahoe Bicycle Achievement Award for 2013 for its contribution to the advancement of bicycling in the Lake Tahoe region.

In its annual awards, the Society of Outdoor Recreation Professionals commended the Tahoe Transportation District’s State Route 28 Corridor Management Plan for its excellence in collaboration and positive impacts.

The plan includes 13 local, state and federal agencies in an effort to manage, preserve and promote the National Scenic Byway of State Route 28, which runs from Spooner Summit to Crystal Bay.

Tahoe Regional Planning Agency recognized the Tahoe Transportation District with a Best in the Basin award for its bus shelter project. The project installed 10 new bus shelters along U.S. 50 and Pioneer Trail in South Lake Tahoe, providing bike racks, bear-safe trash cans and improved seating, safety, comfort and weather protection for riders.

“We sought to develop a shelter design that is more reflective of Tahoe’s alpine setting, and this timber structure is one that accounts for safety, visibility, aesthetics and cost with associated construction and maintenance,” said Alfred Knotts, project manager for the Tahoe Transportation District.


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Tahoe Daily Tribune Updated Jul 22, 2014 04:33PM Published Jul 21, 2014 08:28PM Copyright 2014 Tahoe Daily Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.