Funding approved for Lake Tahoe’s Rubicon Trail | TahoeDailyTribune.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Funding approved for Lake Tahoe’s Rubicon Trail

Land Rovers on the Rubicon Trail.
Getty Images

Funding for Rubicon Trail Operations and Maintenance Grant in the amount of $564,972 from the California Department of Parks and Recreation, with matching funds in the amount of $161,824 from El Dorado-Sacramento Municipal Utility District Cooperation Agreement Fund (SMUD funds), $12,500 from volunteer labor, and $14,000 from in-kind materials for a project total of $753,296.

Funding for Rubicon Trail Education and Safety Grant in the amount of $67,189 from the California Department of Parks and Recreation, with matching funds in the amount of $28,469 from State Off-Highway Vehicle License Fees with $6,250 from volunteer labor for a project total of $101,908.

Funding for Rubicon Trail Planning Grant in the amount of $102,925 from the California Department of Parks and Recreation, with matching funds in the amount of $38,040 from outside funding for a project total of $140,965

Funding for the Rubicon Restoration in the amount of $41,395 from the California Department of Parks and Recreation plus match requirement of $9,525 from the El Dorado-Sacramento Municipal Utility District Cooperation Agreement Fund (SMUD funds) for a total of $50,920.

Funding for Restoration SPTC in the amount of $39,032 from the California Department of Parks and Recreation plus match requirement of $44,823 from State Off-Highway Vehicle License Fees for a total of $83,855.

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. — El Dorado County is stepping up to help Placer County with maintenance of the Rubicon Trail.

At their Jan. 28 meeting, El Dorado County Board of Supervisors approved $336,729 in grant funding from California State Parks, Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Project Agreements for work to be done on Rubicon Trail.

This money will be used for maintenance, education and planning for the trail.

The Rubicon Trail, declared a public highway in 1887, spans El Dorado and Placer counties. While it is a public highway, El Dorado County got an easement from the Forest Service and act as land managers for their side of the trail.

Support Local Journalism


Placer County still allows the Forest Service to act as land managers. On the Placer side, the trail goes into three different forests, Tahoe, El Dorado and Lake Tahoe Basin.

“El Dorado has performed a lot of maintenance on our side of the trail and to get continuity with the Placer side, El Dorado County reached out to Placer County to see if they were interested in having us help them to maintain the trail in the same manner that we have on our side,” said Vicki Sanders, El Dorado County Parks Manager.

In 2009, El Dorado County received a Clean-Up and Abatement Order from the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board. In response, the county went to work cleaning up their side of the trail and implementing 475 best management practices. The order was lifted in 2014 but El Dorado County wants to take the lessons they learned to the Placer County side.

“It provides the continuity that was needed to maintain this trail, it also treats the trail the same in the two counties,” Sanders said.

A Memorandum of Outstanding was put in place between El Dorado County, Placer County and the three forests to agree to work together on maintenance.

Rubicon Trail plays an important part in the area’s economics.

According to Sanders, an economic study showed it brings in $57 million for California annually, $16 million for El Dorado County and $9.8 million for Placer County.

“On the Placer side, there are some maintenance practices that we feel could put the trail in jeopardy,” Sanders said.

One of her first projects will include using a helicopter she received from a prior grant to bring in rocks to fix Cadillac Hill.

Projects will start as soon as the snow melts but she thinks work on Cadillac might to have until later in the season.

To keep up-to-date on work being done, visit the Rubicon Trail page on El Dorado County’s website.


Support Local Journalism

Readers around the Lake Tahoe Basin and beyond make the Tahoe Tribune's work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Your donation will help us continue to cover COVID-19 and our other vital local news.

For tax deductible donations, click here.


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User