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Callie’s Cabin: Honey cures for your own kitchen

Cal Orey / Special to the Tribune
A glass cup of tea with lemon, mint, ginger and honey on wooden rustic table.
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Did you know that September is National Honey Month?

It’s the time for us to turn to nature’s nectar from the sacred honey bee. Drawing on the 21st century honey buzz, here are my favorite honey home remedies, straight from the popular book The Healing Powers of Honey (Kensington).

You, like me, may suffer from common health ailments during our seasonal changes around the Lake. These are tried-and-true folk remedies based on scientific studies, real-life stories, medical doctors, researchers, and beekeepers.

1. ALLERGIES (Stop seasonal misery): Dealing with annoying sneezing, a runny nose, and coughing is no picnic, thanks to grass and tree fall pollen. But honey may come to your rescue.

What Honey Rx to Use: Try eating a tablespoon of locally produced honey. Proponents of honey tell me that your immune system will get used to the local pollen in it (it should be within a 50-mile radius from where you live).

Why You’ll Bee Happy: By taking the honey cure, you may lose your allergy symptoms. It’s worth the effort and is less pricey than a visit to the doctor or an allergist. Honey may enhance the immune system to build up a better arsenal against airborne allergens–and help you breathe easier. Honeycomb may line the entire breathing tract.

2. ENERGY DRAIN (Beat low energy): Getting your cough under control is a good thing, but then what if your energy plummets? Liquid gold may be the answer again.

What Honey Rx to Use: Each morning include a teaspoon of bee pollen in your breakfast. Go ahead and take it solo. Or try The Honey Association’s Energy Drink recipe: ¼ pint orange juice, ¼ pint natural yogurt, 2 tablespoons clear honey. Place all the ingredients in a liquidizer and blend until smooth. Pour into two tall glasses. Serves two people.

Why You’ll Bee Happy: Honey is a source of natural unrefined sugars and carbohydrates, which are easily absorbed by the body. That means, you’ll get a quick energy boost with long-lasting effects. Athletes include it in their daily diets. It was even used by runners at the Olympic Games in ancient Greece.

3. SORE THROAT (Take the sting away): A sore throat from pollen or smoky skies from our California wildfires can drag you down, too, where don’t feel like walking or talking. Honey has been used as a home for centuries to help sooth one of the symptoms associated with a common cold–namely, a killer sore throat.

What Honey Rx to Use: For relief of symptoms, take a spoonful of your buckwheat honey, as often as you need, to relieve irritation. In between, sip a cup of tea with honey. Also, try pure honeycomb and honey sticks. Don’t forget all-natural honey-lemon lozenges, which also coat the throat for quick relief.

Why You’ll Bee Happy: One, honey will coat your sore throat, the symptom of the cause. Two, the antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties will help heal the culprit causing your pain.

4. WAIST WHITTLER (Blast pandemic pudge): Got tummy bulge from munching on comfort food and staying indoors? No worries. Honey comes to the rescue. There are tricks you can do to get a flat tummy before autumn arrives!

What Honey Rx to Use: Both morning and night, drink an 8-ounce glass or mug of tea (dandelion or parsley boasts diuretic effects), with a teaspoon of honey and a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar. Team this potion with grazing and watch your fat and sugar intake.

Why You’ll Bee Happy: Honey and apple cider vinegar contain the bloat-busting mineral potassium. Also, turning to honey will help you to eat fewer sugary treats and enjoy a flatter stomach just in time for autumn – a sweet season for both locals and tourists.

So, go ahead and use the type of honey advised or your own preference; all-natural, raw honey, dark varietals are recommended for best results. (Warning: To avoid infant botulism, do not fee honey to an infant.)

Cal Orey, M.A., is an author and journalist. Her books include the Healing Powers Series (Vinegar, Olive Oil, Chocolate, HonTey, Coffee, Tea, Superfoods, Essential Oils, Herbs and Spices) published by Kensington. (The collection has been featured by the Good Cook Book Club.) Her website is http://www.calorey.com.


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