News briefs: Fire restrictions start July 1, Jaycee Dugard interview and more | TahoeDailyTribune.com

News briefs: Fire restrictions start July 1, Jaycee Dugard interview and more

JAYCEE DUGARD ON ‘20/20’

According to ABCNews.go.com, “ABC News Anchor Diane Sawyer has the first television interview with Jaycee Dugard five years after their first sit down following her miraculous rescue from captivity. Dugard will discuss adjusting to a new life and reintegrating into society, which she reveals in her new memoir ‘Freedom: My Book of Firsts.’”

Dugard was kidnapped in Meyers in 1991 and held in captivity for 18 years. The Diane Sawyer special edition of 20/20 will air Friday, July 8 from 10-11 p.m. on ABC.

TEXAS 4000 TEAM ROLLS INTO SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

Support Local Journalism

On the longest annual charity bicycle ride in the world, the Texas 4000 team will be rolling through South Lake Tahoe on Friday, July 1, and Saturday, July 2, just 28 days after departing from Austin, Texas, on their way to Anchorage, Alaska. While in South Lake Tahoe, the 2016 Texas 4000 Team will celebrate and share hope, knowledge and charity with friends and family before continuing on their 70-day journey.

The 67 undergraduate and graduate students from University of Texas at Austin will brave the rain, sleet, wind, snow, heat and pedal more than 4,000 miles in the fight against cancer. After 18 months of leadership development training, volunteering, fundraising and cycling, riders are put to the test throughout their summer ride to Alaska.

Along their journey, they will visit with cancer survivors, patients, caregivers and communities to make educational presentations about cancer prevention and early detection. They also use this time to offer hope, encouragement and share their personal stories to cancer fighters of all ages and to those who have been affected by the disease. Every encounter is an inspirational story the riders carry with them on their journey and quest to fight cancer.

PLAY BRIDGE

An ACBL sanctioned duplicate bridge game is planned for Tuesdays at 12:45 p.m. in the South Lake Senior Center. Call John Guerry at 530-543-0237 or 530-318-3887, or email jguerrysr!@gmail.com. This is a year-round event.

Lake Tahoe Men’s Bridge Club meets every Thursday to play bridge year-round. It kicks off at 9:30 a.m. at South Lake Tahoe Senior Center. It’s a casual game with lunch at noon.

ART LEAGUE PRESENTATION

Tahoe Art League invites the public to a presentation featuring internationally acclaimed muralist John Pugh, titled “Creating a Sense of Place.” It’s planned for Wednesday, July 13, from 6-8 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

“Creating a sense of place is paramount. It is important to me as a muralist to research the area and its community, formulating concepts based upon a multitude of historical, environmental and cultural viewpoints,” Pugh said. “If the mural can serve to educate about the culture and heritage of a place, it will deepen roots and create a pride of place. This inspires new possibilities, the sharing of ideas and assists in bridging cultural gaps in the community.”

Visit http://www.talart.org to view examples of Pugh’s murals displayed worldwide and for more event information.

FIRE RESTRICTIONS BEGIN JULY 1

Fire restrictions on National Forest System lands in the Lake Tahoe Basin begin Friday, July 1, and will remain in effect until the official end of fire season.

Campfires will be restricted to certain exempted recreation sites and other fire-related activities will be prohibited. Illegal and unattended campfires cause over 90 percent of wildfires in the Lake Tahoe Basin and increased fire danger due to the ongoing drought and warm summer weather is a big concern at Lake Tahoe. Fire restrictions help reduce the possibility of human-caused fires.

“Given the past several years of drought we’ve experienced and our current warm temperatures, we ask that the public follow restrictions and help us to keep the Lake Tahoe Basin safe from human caused wildfires,” Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit (LTBMU) forest supervisor Jeff Marsolais said.

“Folks need to remain vigilant and remember that campfires and charcoal grills are only allowed in approved areas of the National Forest.”

On National Forest System Lands, fire restrictions mean:

No open fires, campfires or charcoal fires are allowed outside of exempted recreation sites (see Forest Order) even with a valid campfire permit. Campfires must be built within agency-installed and approved fire rings or grills. Lanterns and portable stoves using gas, jellied petroleum or pressurized liquid fuel are allowed with a valid California Campfire Permit available at http://www.preventwildfireca.org/campfire-permit or from Forest Service offices during normal business hours;

No smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle, building or exempted recreation site;

Internal combustion engines are restricted to National Forest System roads, routes, trails and areas as identified on the LTBMU Motor Vehicle Use Map at http://www.fs.usda.gov/goto/ltbmu/travelmanagement;

No possessing, discharging or using any kind of firework or other pyrotechnic device, using an explosive or operating a welding or other torch with an open flame. All fireworks, including sparklers and firecrackers, are always illegal in the Lake Tahoe Basin.

The fire restriction Forest Order will be posted at http://www.fs.usda.gov/goto/ltbmu/forestorders as soon as it becomes available.

For more information on fire restrictions, call the Forest Supervisor’s office at 530-543-2600, Monday through Friday (excluding holidays) from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., or the Taylor Creek Visitor Center at 530-543-2674 on weekends and holidays.

Information about private land fire restrictions, regulated by the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE), is available at http://www.calfire.ca.gov.


Support Local Journalism

Readers around the Lake Tahoe Basin and beyond make the Tahoe Tribune's work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Your donation will help us continue to cover COVID-19 and our other vital local news.



Local


See more