News briefs: Ice safety tips, nutrition program and more | TahoeDailyTribune.com
YOUR AD HERE »

News briefs: Ice safety tips, nutrition program and more

ICE Safety TIPS

During this time of year in Lake Tahoe, ice may appear thick enough to walk on, but the thickness is unreliable and the ice may break. South Lake Tahoe Fire and Rescue wants to remind the community and its visitors with ice smart safety tips.

At local areas such as Lakeview Commons and Ski Run Marina, several individuals have ventured out onto the ice, however some of the depths are 5 or more feet deep and are dangerous conditions. Lake ice is most fragile in frozen areas around an open patch and along the shore. Avoid rivers and lake shorelines, where even ice that looks solid is weak.

Follow these tips:

Ice is never 100 percent safe and the best advice is to stay off it. If you do venture onto the ice, remember:

Check the weather and avoid ice-related activities on warm or stormy days.

Check ice conditions with knowledgeable local individuals and obey all ice warning signs.

Keep away from unfamiliar paths or unknown ice, and avoid traveling on ice at night.

Never go onto the ice alone. A buddy may be able to rescue you or go for help if you get into difficulty.

Before you leave shore, inform someone of your destination and expected time of return.

A thermal protection buoyant suit will increase your chances of survival if you do go through the ice. If you do not have one, wear a life jacket/personal flotation device (PFD) over an ordinary snowmobile suit or layered winter clothing.

Assemble a small personal safety kit no larger than the size of a man’s wallet, to carry on your person. The kit should include a lighter, waterproof matches or magnesium fire starter, pocketknife, compass and whistle.

In addition to the above safety equipment, you should also carry ice picks, an ice staff and rope. A cellular phone could also help save your life.

Insist that children, if they do play on ice, are always under adult supervision. Children not within arm’s reach have ventured too far.

KIWANIS TO LEARN ABOUT NUTRITION PROGRAM

On Wednesday, Jan. 6, Diane Weidinger of St. Theresa Church’s Bread and Broth program will address the Kiwanis Club of Tahoe Sierra. She will explain a new program called Bread & Broth 4 Kids, which offers nutritious, easy-to-prepare meals and snacks for children who otherwise would go hungry over the weekend and during school breaks when free hot meals provided by the school lunch program are not available. The public is invited to attend the one-hour Kiwanis meeting. The luncheon meeting begins promptly at noon at the Cantina Restaurant on Emerald Bay Road. Call Bob Fleischer at 530-541-1610 for more information.

SOUTH TAHOE ACTION TEAMS

The South Lake Tahoe Fire Department is accepting applications for the 2016 winter session of STAT: South Tahoe Action Teams. This program is for community members to be trained by the South Lake Tahoe Fire Department as responders during times of crisis. Curriculum will include nine hours of instruction taught by members of the South Lake Tahoe Fire Department. Applicants will be expected to commit their time and will be called upon in times of natural disaster, large-scale emergencies and times of need in the South Lake Tahoe area. We will also need STAT team members to be well versed in command structure, emergency first aid, lifting/moving techniques, use of extinguishers, flood safety and building collapse. Training will occur Wednesday nights, Jan. 13, 20 and 27 from 6-9 p.m.

Applications are available online at http://www.cityofslt.us/firestat and due by Wednesday, Jan. 6.

PARKS & RECREATION COMMISSION MEETING

Attend the upcoming Parks and Recreation Commission meeting on Thursday, Jan. 14, at 9 a.m. in the City Council Chambers located at 1901 Airport Road. For more information, call 530-542-6056.


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

Readers around the Lake Tahoe Basin and beyond make the Tahoe Tribune's work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Your donation will help us continue to cover COVID-19 and our other vital local news.

For tax deductible donations, click here.

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User