South Lake Tahoe City Council to consider Loop Road, paid parking, street rehab program | TahoeDailyTribune.com

South Lake Tahoe City Council to consider Loop Road, paid parking, street rehab program

South Lake Tahoe City Council is hosting a meeting to discuss the Loop Road Thursday, March 14.
Ryan Hoffman / Tahoe Daily Tribune

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. — City Council will consider a resolution tomorrow setting forth city policy regarding the U.S 50 South Shore Community Revitalization Project, commonly referred to as the Loop Road project.

The resolution, which was requested by several members of council following a community meeting in March, expresses the city’s desire to “be an active partner in the development, planning, and construction” of the project.

It also commits the city to engage with the community in an effort to achieve “an overall Project that is beneficial to the people of South Lake Tahoe.”

Perhaps most important, the resolution reiterates budgetary priorities — specifically police, fire, street maintenance and snow removal — and commits the city to spend available general revenues on those priorities, rather than the U.S. 50 project.

However, the city does recognize there could be dedicated funding sources for the project, such as grants, that would not detract from the city’s ability to provide the previously identified core services.

In those cases, the city will assist in the pursuit and allocation of those funds to help with development, planning and construction of the project, according to the resolution.

Click here to read the resolution.

Lastly, the resolution recognizes there could be some byproducts of the project that the city assumes responsibility for, such as streetscape and parking. In those scenarios, City Council at that time will determine how to fund those costs.

The resolution on Tuesday’s agenda is just the latest example of heightened involvement in the project by the city. In March, council hosted a meeting to gather community feedback regarding the project.

Following that meeting, Councilor Cody Bass suggested staff draft a resolution encompassing concerns expressed at the meeting.

Bass’ suggestion had vocal support from councilors Devin Middlebrook and Tamara Wallace.

At the March 19 council meeting, Wallace said the listening session with the community was a positive step for the city.

“The community was so impressed that we sat there and listened …” she said.

Elsewhere on the agenda council will consider:

• A proposal to add up to 47 paid parking spaces along Bellamy Court adjacent to Heavenly Village. Staff initially suggest adding up to 57 new spaces, but 10 spaces on Heavenly Village Way were eliminated from the proposal based on public feedback at a February public meeting, according to the staff report.

The project is estimated to cost $200,000, which would come from the city’s available fund balance. The city estimates the parking spaces could generate approximately $85,000 annually in revenue. If approved, the project would be completed this fall or the following spring.

• A 2019 street rehabilitation program. The proposal calls for investing nearly $3.6 million, consisting of $1.95 million recently appropriated by council, $365,000 in state funding and $1.25 million in grant funding associated with the Sierra Boulevard project.

The plan would see the reconstruction of 2.4 miles of street — approximately 1.8 miles of residential streets in the Gardner Mountain neighborhood and an additional 0.6 mile as part of the Sierra Boulevard complete street project, according to the staff report.