More boom for the buck: Fireworks show lengthens, but is shorter than previous years |

More boom for the buck: Fireworks show lengthens, but is shorter than previous years

Adam Jensen

Adam Jensen / Tahoe Daily TribuneKen Dixon, the president of Pyrodigital Consultants, Inc., walks along one of three barges that will be used during Sunday's "Lights on the Lake" fireworks display.

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. – The most well-attended fireworks display at Lake Tahoe, “Lights on the Lake” will be longer than 2009, but not quite as lengthy as it has been in the past, according to event organizers.

Although the South Shore fireworks display has gone as long as 28 minutes, this year’s display will last about 22, said Carol Chaplin, Executive Director of the Lake Tahoe Visitors Authority, which puts on the show.

Last year, budget concerns cut the display down to 20 minutes.

“We did make a conscious choice to cut it back last year because of our budget,” Chaplin said.

She said the visitors authority is “pretty positive” about their current budget, which began Thursday.

“It’s not at the historical level that it was but we feel like we have a little breathing room,” Chaplin said.

Recommended Stories For You

Budget concerns nearly scrapped Labor Day fireworks in 2009, but that display is also scheduled to take place this year, Chaplin said.

And Sunday’s 22 minute show will still pack in plenty of excitement, Chaplin added.

Ken Dixon, the president of Pyrodigital Consultants, Inc. who has designed fireworks displays at the lake for nearly the past 30 years, said he has always emphasized quality over quantity during the performances.

Dixon designed this year’s computer-controlled show in May. The fireworks display will be launched from three barges outside of the Tahoe Keys Marina.

Fireworks that explode into cubes, jellyfish, hearts, happy faces and palm trees will all be part of the mix of basic and “very high end” fireworks that will light up the night sky on Sunday, Nixon said.

The shells are a mixture of U.S., Chinese, Japanese, Italian and Spanish varieties, Nixon said.