Movement Improvement: Could vs. should | TahoeDailyTribune.com

Movement Improvement: Could vs. should

Jessica Monaloy
Movement Improvement

Could and should are two very different words with two very different meanings. The difference between these two words can mean the difference between a regular recovery from injury or surgery and a recovery riddled with complications and setbacks.

Having been through injuries myself, I know the feeling of wanting to get that green light to go out and resume your favorite activity. This is where it is my job as the movement expert to explain the difference between these two words. Just because you CAN do something doesn’t mean you SHOULD do something. You may be able to perform that activity, but you may be doing it in a way that can set you up for reinjury and end up sidelining you for even longer down the road.

I come across this with anything from walking to running to skiing, etc. Your surgeon tells you that you don’t need those crutches anymore, and you can’t wait to toss them aside. You come walking in to your next physical therapy appointment without them but with a very noticeable limp. Even though your surgery is now stable and can take your full weight, your body doesn’t have the strength yet to walk with the correct pattern. If you continue to walk with an incorrect pattern you may develop other issues that can put you at risk for injury or pain. Another example I see with this phenomenon is with running. It may be a minor injury or pain that you CAN run through, but if you do not have the appropriate strength, stability and control to run correctly, then you probably SHOULDN’T.

Bridging the gap between could and should is often a matter of correcting bad patterns through the right exercises to retrain your body and, along with that, patience. Patience is the hardest part.

For the expertise to identify and correct those movement patterns, call Jessica at Meyers Physical Therapy today.

Jessica Monaloy is a physical therapist in Meyers. She can be reached at 530-721-3253 or jessica@meyersphysicaltherapy.com. Visit her website at http://www.meyersphysicaltherapy.com.


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