Letters to the editor for March 28 | TahoeDailyTribune.com

Letters to the editor for March 28

California State Parks is considering changes to the Lake Tahoe Golf Course. As of now, there are four options: 1) reroute the course; 2) create a nine-hole course; 3) close the course; or 4) leave the course as it is.

The Lake Tahoe Golf Course is a vital part of our economy. Last year, 35,000 rounds of golf were played (80 percent of which were played by tourists). Almost 4,000 visitors attended weddings at the course, and the course employs more than 75 people. These numbers translate into thousands of dollars being spent in local restaurants and motels, on groceries, shopping, gas and gambling, all of which help fuel our local economy.

The golf course hosts numerous charity golf tournaments for individuals and organizations. Last year’s Angora Fire Victims Tournament raised almost $15,000 to assist those left homeless. While other tournaments raised less money, they were equally important to the individuals they helped.

Lake Tahoe Golf Course is part of our economy and our community. Closing the course or creating a nine-hole course are not viable options. By closing the course, California State Parks will lose more than $750,000 in fees paid by the course, the majority of which is spent on projects in the Tahoe Basin. The nine-hole option will not come close to generating these kinds of fees. Our residents and visitors deserve the option of playing an affordable 18-hole championship golf course that the Lake Tahoe Golf Course provides.

The California State Parks decision affects us all: residents, visitors and every business on both sides of the state line. Both chambers of commerce, the Lake Tahoe Visitors Authority, the lodging association, the city council, the county commission and all our local service organizations must involve themselves and not allow the state parks department to make any course decision without their input.

John Sattler

South Lake Tahoe

I am writing to you as a local who is disappointed with how it seems that Tahoe’s main objective is to appeal to the tourists. Honestly, I don’t see how building a huge convention center is going to appeal to anyone. People have come to Tahoe to get away from their normal lives. Many people come to be in the mountains, look around the lake and be surrounded by nature – not be bombarded with baubles that you could get anyplace.

I believe we should stop trying to remodel ourselves as another Aspen, Colo., and be Lake Tahoe, Calif. Having been born in South Lake Tahoe, I have seen differences in our community in just a matter of 10 years. So many of our Tahoans are now moving elsewhere because they can’t afford to live here anymore, and they have just gotten tired of the neverending changes and so-called “improvements” to the town they grew to love.

Robben Charles

South Lake Tahoe

Have you ever been sitting around in a desk or a chair wondering why you are still sitting there? That’s how I feel when I’m stuck in a classroom at South Tahoe High School for an extra week or two, all because of these snow days.

It seems like we are sitting in school longer and longer every year because of these snow days. I think we all know that the students have no choice of when it is going to snow, or how much, or even if school should be canceled, so why do we get punished for it? We should not be punished for this act of God. If we were to not make up these snow days, then we would only be losing a week of school. I think we all know that during this week, all we do is watch movies or go to Ernie’s for some breakfast.

It seems that making us go to school for that dreadful long-lasting week is only hurting us, because I really don’t think that any student is sitting in class still wanting to learn while the rest of their class has either left and gone to the beach or is sitting around watching a movie.

Derek Holmgren

South Lake Tahoe


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