Richard Curry delivers sense of humor | TahoeDailyTribune.com

Richard Curry delivers sense of humor

Susan Wood
New Zephyr Cove Postmaster Richard Curry consults the pirate's skull on important matters, like what to choose for lunch.
ALL |

Although he’s only been on the job for a few months, Zephyr Cove Postmaster Richard Curry’s office environment says more about him than his spicy last name.

A “Pirates of the Caribbean” skull figurine sits on the edge of the desk. You shake it, and it provides varying messages. He got it from McDonald’s as a promotional item for the movie.

“I have fun with the employees with this,” he said.

Curry has a sense of humor.

A sign on the wall states: “I started with nothing. I still have most of it left.”

Curry is humble.

A coffee mug on his desk reads: “May your future success put your grandest dreams to shame.”

Curry is a traveler. And in the work place, he’s a career traveler with the U.S. Postal Service.

Before Curry came on board at the Roundhill Square post office, he served as the Carson City postmaster. The high posts bring a tendency to move around, so Curry is staying put in his Dayton-area home.

While he’s on the South Shore, the 53-year-old man who’s been with the Postal Service for 24 years and in management for 16 of those years implied he feels right at home at the lake. He’s an outdoor enthusiast who likes to go power boating, hiking and fishing – with his largest catch weighing in at 4 pounds.

Curry also likes to travel where he can capture the culture of an area. He just returned from a trip to the South that turned into a genealogy journey involving his great, great grandfather.

“I’m constantly learning something,” he said.

Curry is inquisitive.

He’s roamed the business community in his area to meet the town folk. The outreach involves a standard get-to-know and education about the role of the post office in a community. He sees it as a sign of stability in unsettled times – much like public safety entities.

“I take a lot of pride in the postal service and the people in it for stepping up in the community,” the manager of 14 employees said. He especially noticed the stability during the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The national mail delivery service was tested with the threat of anthrax scares.

The impact is still being felt. By next year, U.S. Homeland Security will require passports to Canada and Mexico as well as other countries.

Curry is able and ready. He’s established a full-service passport service at the post office, along with other mailing programs geared toward the business professional as well as the individual.

Curry sees his job overseeing the Stateline and Zephyr Cove post offices as being adaptive to changing times. He said the station’s policy of not making home delivery has kept his customers more secure at their 8,000 post office boxes.

“In a day and age of identify theft, a lot of people don’t want home delivery,” he said.

With eBay such a hit and e-mail serving a different need, Curry believes the postal service can sell its personalization at the counter and versatility. E-mail and items like electronic cards have to be read on a computer.

Curry is a planner. He wants to implement a community-pride bulletin board that highlights good deeds in the area. He also intends to put together a newsletter that promotes the innovations at the post office. He’ll also evaluate the hours at the offices, two of the few in town open on Saturday.

But it’s all about the tried-and-true core service that’s most important to Curry.

“As much as I talk about changes in the post office, it’s that perception from the public the post office is the post office that matters. It doesn’t change,” he said.


Support Local Journalism

Your support means a better informed community. Donate today.


News


See more