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South Tahoe native competes on NBC’s Making It!

Laney Griffo
lgriffo@tahoedailytribune.com
Adam Kingman
Provided by Evans Vestal Ward/NBC

 

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. — One South Lake Tahoe native is making it on the television show “Making It!”

“Making It!’ is a NBC show hosted by Amy Poehler and Nick Offerman, in which makers from all over the country compete in complicated do-it-yourself crafts to determine who is the best.

This season’s roster includes South Lake Tahoe native Adam Kingman.



“Growing up in Lake Tahoe, I spent a lot of time outside and there was always an element of outdoor stewardship,” Kingman told the Tribune. “I learned to be creative while protecting the environment.”

Kingman is son of former MLB slugger Dave Kingman who was known for his prodigious power and amassed 442 home runs in his career.



Adam Kingman surprised Offerman in the first episode by telling him who his dad was. Offerman was shocked and said, “He was my childhood hero.“

Kingman studied industrial design, which he describes as form meeting function. He’s worked on creating outdoor gear and he currently is a design consultant in San Francisco where he’s worked on everything from installation design to tech products.

“Basically anything you can touch and interact with,” Kingman said. “It’s somewhere between art and engineering.”

He watched the last season of Making It! and didn’t see any industrial designers on the show. So, he sent in an audition tape and just a few weeks later, he was accepted on the show.

“I was stoked, there was a little bit of disbelief because it happened so fast,” Kingman said.

The show is currently half-way through the season and Kingman said the experience has been, “far better,” then he could’ve expected.

“Nick and Amy are such thoughtful hosts and I love working with other creatives,” Kingman said. “It’s a creative Utopian workspace.”

So far, he’s had a few especially memorable experiences. One being in episode four when everyone dressed up in costumes.

“It was so lighthearted, so silly,” Kingman said.

He also built a lending library for Seattle that changes color, which has been one of his favorite projects.

But one of the most memorable experiences came from an interaction he had with Poehler.

“Amy said to me, ‘everytime we go by your work station, you stop and explain what you’re doing to us and we learn so much from you,’” Kingman said.

Amy Poehler and Nick Offerman talk to Adam Kingman during an episode. (Provided)

“How do I continue to tell stories and teach,” Kingman added, talking about what he’s going to take home from his time on the show.

Most of the crafts he’s built on the show have included used outdoor gear, such as climbing rope, plywood or retired skis.

“I want to inspire people to bring a second life to all these pieces you’ve brought with you on all your adventures,” Kingman.

New episodes air on Thursdays at 8 p.m. on NBC and the season can be streamed on Peacock.


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