Three South Shore projects named in TRPA’s Best in Basin Awards | TahoeDailyTribune.com

Three South Shore projects named in TRPA’s Best in Basin Awards

Claire Cudahy
ccudahy@tahoedailytribune.com
A young biker catches air at the Bijou Bike Park, one of the projects recognized by TRPA's Best in Basin program this year.
File Photo |

Three projects on the South Shore were recognized by the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency in its annual Best in Basin program.

The Best in Basin program, now in its 26th year, showcases projects that are in line with Lake Tahoe’s environment and communities.

Of the nine projects recognized this year, three were in South Lake Tahoe: Bijou Bike Park, Sawmill 2B Bike Path and Erosion Control Project, and Angora Burn Area Restoration Phase III.

“These projects illustrate the progress our partners are making to restore and conserve our environment, improve our communities, and make our region more sustainable,” said Joanne S. Marchetta, executive director of TRPA.

The Bijou Bike Park was created by the City of South Lake Tahoe and volunteers from the Tahoe Area Mountain Biking Association (TAMBA). The bike park includes a world-class BMX track, two pump tracks, three slopestyle jump lines, and a loop trail within the five acres of forest land in Bijou Community Park.

South Lake Tahoe Mayor Pro Tem Austin Sass recognized Assistant Public Works Director Jim Marino and Tahoe Area Mountain Biking Association President Ben Fish as the driving forces behind the Bijou Bike Park.

The Sawmill 2B Bike Path and Erosion Control Project was spearheaded by El Dorado County and partners. Together they built 1.2 miles of Class 1 bikeway, connecting South Lake Tahoe and Meyers.

The project included water quality improvements to reduce erosion and stormwater pollution. Thick forested areas long the bikeway were also thinned to help reduce wildfire risk.

Lastly, the U.S. Forest Service Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit was recognized for the work accomplished over the last nine years in the 3,100-acre burn area from the Angora Fire.

Since 2007, the Forest Service, in conjunction with community and government partners, has reforested 672 acres, restored 44 acres of aspen and meadow, and completed 1,400 acres of fuels reduction and forest thinning to reduce the risk of wildfires.

They have also relocated roads and trails out of stream zones, installed new signage, and restored 2,000 feet of stream channel.

Winners of the Best in Basin were announced at the TRPA Governing Board meeting on Sept. 28 in Kings Beach.




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