Tahoe Regional Planning Agency releases draft environmental document on shoreline plan | TahoeDailyTribune.com

Tahoe Regional Planning Agency releases draft environmental document on shoreline plan

By early next year the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency is expected to adopt new regulations guiding shoreline development, including the addition of new piers.

The public has just under two months to review and comment on a draft environmental impact statement for the proposed Lake Tahoe Shoreline Plan.

The draft document, which the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA) released earlier this week, will be available for review and comment until July 9.

If adopted, the proposed shoreline plan, the product of a two-year collaborative process, would mark first major update to TRPA's shoreline regulations in three decades.

The plan calls for lifting a decade-long moratorium on new shoreline structures at Lake Tahoe, authorizing up to two new public boat ramps and 10 new public piers, as well as up to 128 new private piers that would be permitted gradually with a priority for pier projects that serve multiple property owners or retire pier development potential on other lakefront properties, according to TRPA.

The plan would authorize up to 1,430 new buoys for lakefront properties and homeowners associations and create a reserve pool of 630 buoys or boat slips for use by public agencies and marinas. The plan would not authorize any new marinas but would allow marinas to expand or reconfigure their sites if they incorporate environmental improvements that reduce stormwater pollution, control aquatic invasive species, or reduce boat emissions.

"Lake Tahoe has struggled for decades to update its shoreline regulations. This marks a major milestone for this collaborative planning process and for our region," Joanne Marchetta, executive director of TRPA, said in a press release. "By continuing to work together in the months to come, I am confident we can approve a broadly-supported shoreline plan that will benefit the lake and its environment and people's ability to enjoy it."

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Partners in the shoreline planning process include California State Lands Commission, Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board, Lake Tahoe Marina Association, League to Save Lake Tahoe, Nevada Division of State Lands, Tahoe Lakefront Owners' Association, and TRPA.

The draft environmental impact statement examines the potential impacts of the proposed shoreline plan, which, according to TRPA, has been endorsed by the Shoreline Steering Committee, Joint Fact-Finding Committee, and Regional Plan Implementation Committee of the TRPA Governing Board, as well as several alternatives to the proposed plan.

To prevent shoreline erosion and recreation conflicts between motorized and non-motorized watercraft and swimmers, the proposed plan would maintain Lake Tahoe's 600-foot no-wake-zone and expand it to include all of Emerald Bay. TRPA says it also is working with shoreline partners and law enforcement agencies to enhance compliance with the no-wake-zone.

The draft environmental impact statement is available for review at the TRPA offices and online at http://www.ShorelinePlan.org, where people can ask questions about the plan, submit comments about the environmental impacts and proposed mitigation measures, sign up for email notifications about the planning process and upcoming meetings, or request a Shoreline Plan presentation from TRPA staff.

Upcoming public hearings will take place at the TRPA offices in Stateline. The first with the TRPA Governing Board will take place at 9:30 a.m. May 23. The second with the TRPA Advisory Planning Commission will take place at 9:30 a.m. June 13.