Callie’s Cabin: A bit of honey for wintry woes (Recipe) | TahoeDailyTribune.com

Callie’s Cabin: A bit of honey for wintry woes (Recipe)

Cal Orey / Special to the Tribune
A glass cup of tea with lemon, mint, ginger and honey.
Getty Images

Hello to honey cures. These are tried-and-true folk remedies based on scientific studies, real-life stories, medical doctors, researchers, and beekeepers.

About a week ago, I had a killer sore throat. It was R&R time. I sipped hot tea spiked with fresh lemon and honey. (I recommend raw honey.) Two days later, no cold or flu. I survived.

Here, check out this trio of DIY feel-good immune system-boosting, antioxidant-rich raw honey concoctions. These home remedies may help you to get or stay healthy this season.

1. COUGH (Outfox irritating hacking): A cough is an unwelcome visitor and can make you feel terrible. Let’s face it, cough medicine can be pricey, doesn’t taste good, and may or may not do its job. People are inside more during colder weather so you’re exposed to more germs. And if someone is coughing you may be next in line.

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What Honey Rx to Use: A teaspoon of buckwheat honey is recommended before bed. Or you can make syrup of 1 teaspoon lemon juice, 1 teaspoon honey, and 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar. One teaspoon of the medicinal mix should suffice. Repeat as needed.

Why You’ll Bee Happy: Researchers discovered that buckwheat honey at bedtime was more powerful for curing a cough than a cough suppressant found in over-the-counter medications. It is believed that honey will act as a sedative to the nervous system.

2. SORE THROAT (Take the sting away): Hacking is miserable, but a sore throat can drag you down, too, where don’t feel like talking. Honey has been used as a home remedy for centuries to help soothe one of the symptoms associated with a common cold–namely, a killer tell-tale sore throat. February is a popular month for colds and flu which can be accompanied by a raspy throat.

What Honey Rx to Use: For relief of symptoms, sip a cup of anti-inflammatory tea (black, white, green or herbal like chamomile) with honey. Also, try pure honeycomb and honey sticks. Don’t forget all-natural honey-lemon lozenges, which also coat the throat for quick relief. (Yes, I did use these, too. Go for the all-natural kind.)

Why You’ll Bee Happy: One, honey will coat your sore throat, the symptom of the cause. Two, its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties will help heal the culprit causing your pain.

3. INSOMNIA (Find sweet dreams): Getting rid of a sore throat is a challenge. But not getting adequate shut-eye during the pain can drain the immune system, leaving you more vulnerable to colds and flu.

What Rx to Use: Take 1 or 2 teaspoons of your favorite honey, especially before going to bed. Try sipping a cup of 2 percent low-fat milk with a dash of cinnamon. Why You’ll Bee Happy: The tryptophan in milk will help to calm you. Honey, report medical doctors, can calm your nervous system, giving you a relaxing effect on the body and mind.

So, go ahead and use the type of honey advised or your own preference; all-natural, raw honey, dark varietals are recommended for best results. (Warning: To avoid infant botulism, do not fee honey to an infant.)

Honey Waffles

Once you’re not feeling under the weather and are on the mend, here’s an easy feel-good recipe to try.

1 cup cake flour

1 ½ teaspoons baking powder

¾ teaspoon nutmeg

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

2 organic eggs

1 tablespoon honey

European style butter

Confectioner’s sugar

Honey to taste

Fresh fruit

In a mixing bowl, combine flour, baking powder, and spices. In a smaller bowl stir eggs and honey. Pour into dry ingredients. Mix well. Turn on nonstick waffle iron. Pour half batter onto iron. Wait until steam rises. Top with sugar, butter, and drizzle with honey. Add fresh seasonal fruit. Serves 2. Adapted from The Healing Powers of Honey (Kensington) by Cal Orey.

Cal Orey, M.A. Is an author and journalist. Her books include the Healing Powers Series (Vinegar, Olive Oil, Chocolate, Honey, Coffee, Tea, Superfoods and Essential Oils) published by Kensington. (The collection has been featured by the Good Cook Book Club.) Her website is http://www.calorey.com.


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